Thorgerda

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Thorgerda is a 19th-century poem by John Payne. The subject of the poem, Thorgerda, is a woman who threatens to commit suicide in the Egils Saga .

John Payne (poet) English poet and translator

John Payne was an English poet and translator. Initially he pursued a legal career, and associated with Dante Gabriel Rossetti. Later he became involved with limited edition publishing, and the Villon Society.

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