Thorn (dog)

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Thorn was an Alsatian (German Shepherd) dog who received the Dickin Medal (often referred to as "the animals' Victoria Cross") in 1945 from the People's Dispensary for Sick Animals for bravery in service during the Second World War. Thorn's medal was "for locating air-raid casualties in spite of thick smoke in a burning building" during the Blitz. [1] [2]

After the war Thorn went on to a brief acting career, playing a part in the 1948 film Daughter of Darkness. [3]

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Dickin Medal Award

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Maria Elisabeth Dickin CBE was a social reformer and an animal welfare pioneer who founded the People's Dispensary for Sick Animals (PDSA) in 1917. The Dickin Medal is named for her.

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Bing (dog)

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References

  1. "PSDA Dickin Medal". People's Dispensary for Sick Animals . Retrieved 14 February 2022.
  2. Long, David (2012). The Animals' VC: For Gallantry and Devotion . London. pp. 189–193. ISBN   9781848093768.
  3. Hutton, Robin (2018-09-18). War Animals: The Unsung Heroes of World War II. Simon and Schuster. pp. 193–196. ISBN   978-1-62157-766-9.