Thorn (surname)

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Thorn is a surname that may refer to:

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Doyle is a surname of Irish origin. The name is an Anglicisation of the Irish Ó Dubhghaill /oːˈd̪ˠʊwəlʲ/, meaning "descendant of Dubhghall". There is another possible etymology : the Anglo-Norman surname D'Oyley with agglutination of the French article de. It means 'from Ouilly', name of a knight who originated from one of the Ouilly located in Normandy such as Ouilly-le-Tesson, Ouilly-le-Vicomte, etc. The relationship with the family D'Oyly is unknown.

White is a surname either of English or of Scottish and Irish origin, the latter being an anglicisation of the Scottish Gaelic MacGillebhàin, "Son of the fair gillie" and the Irish "Mac Faoitigh" or "de Faoite". It is the seventeenth most common surname in England. In the 1990 United States Census, "White" ranked fourteenth among all reported surnames in frequency, accounting for 0.28% of the population. By 2000, White had fallen to position 20 in the United States and 22nd position by 2014

Russo Surname list

Russo (Italian: [ˈrusso], is a common Southern Italian and Sicilian surname . In Italian, the word Russo means a Russian, and the root of the name originates from Medieval Latin for Rus', meaning, "the men who row," in reference to the Vikings.

Ben is frequently used as a shortened version of the given names Benjamin, Benedict, or Benson, and is also a very common given name in its own right.

Myers is a(n) Dutch, English, and German origin surname. The English origin of the surname has multiple possible sources: Anglo-Saxon England, from the Old English word maire meaning "mayor", the Old French mire meaning "physician", or the Old Norse myrr, meaning "marsh". The German origin of the surname Myers has the meaning "steward or bailiff," as in the magistrate of a city or town.

Cole is a surname of English origin, and is much less frequently a given name. It is of Middle English origin, and its meaning is "swarthy, coal-black, charcoal". The Cole family originated in Cornwall, South West England. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Randolphi Cole, appearing in the Winton Rolls of Hampshire in 1148.

The surname Collins has a variety of likely origins in Britain and Ireland:

  1. Anglo-Saxon: A patronymic surname based on the name Colin, an English diminutive form of Nicholas.
  2. Norse:From the Old Norse personal name "Kollungr" a form of "koli" which in Old English became 'Cola', meaning swarthy or dark.
  3. Irish: The medieval surname was Ua Cuiléin, which has usually become Ó Coileáin today.
  4. Welsh: Collen = hazel, hazel grove.

Courtney is a name of Old French origin, introduced into England after the Norman Conquest of 1066. It has two quite distinct interpretations: firstly, the surname may be locational, from places called Courtenay in the regions of Loiret and Gâtinais. The House of Courtenay was a significant French family with close association with both the French, and thereby, English royal lines; in England the Courtenays were Earls of Devon.

Riley is a surname of English or Irish origin.

Harper is a surname that is also commonly used as a given name in the United States.

Lindsay (name) Name list

Lindsay or Lindsey is an English surname, originally derived from the territory of Lindsey in Lincolnshire, from the Old English toponym Lindesege, i.e. "marshlands of Lincoln". It is found in both England and Scotland, where it gives its name to a clan.

Moody is an English surname. It ranks in the top 200 most common surnames in English speaking nations. The earliest known example dates from the 12th century in a Devonshire early English charter where the name Alwine 'Modig' is mentioned. Recent census research suggests that the surname has been most consistently populous in Somerset, Wiltshire and Hampshire and also in areas of northeast England. There is also a high incidence of the similar-sounding surname 'Moodie' in Scotland, in particular Orkney, although this variant, ending "ie", has possible Norse/Celtic origins. The surname Moody was also carried to areas of Ireland settled by the early English. Although the most intensive areas of occurrence match areas of dense Anglo-Saxon habitation post 1066, it is difficult to determine if the name is Anglo-Saxon or Nordic/Viking in origin, since all Germanic countries used the word 'Modig' or 'Mutig' to indicate someone who was bold, impetuous or brave. Surnames were increasingly given through the early Middle Ages to assist taxation and an increasing incidence of the name can be followed in such documents as the Hundred Rolls, early English charters and general medieval assizes associated with such actions as baronial struggles, Crusades or Angevin campaigns in France. In the Netherlands, there is a family name 'Mudde' derived from a Scottish immigrant Robert Moodie.

Sanders is a patronymic name, meaning son of defender of men. Sander/Alexander. Notable persons with that surname include:

Cassie is a feminine given name and a short form of various other given names mostly used in English-speaking countries. It is more rarely a surname. People and fictional characters named Cassie include:

Sharp is an English language surname, cognate to the German scharf. It is also akin to words which have the sense of scraping, e.g. Latin scrobis 'ditch', Russian skresti 'to scrape'.

Jackson is a common surname of English and Scottish origin. It literally means "son of Jack". In 1980, Jackson was the 24th most popular surname in England and Wales. In the 1990 United States Census, Jackson was the thirteenth most frequently reported surname, accounting for 0.3% of the population.

Bennett is an English language surname ; related to the medieval name Benedict, both ultimately from Latin Benedictus "blessed". Bennett is the English spelling of the Anglo-Norman name Ben[n]et. The oldest public record of the surname is dated 1208 in County Durham. §

English is an English surname. Notable people with the surname include:

Leslie is a surname and given name, derived from the name of Clan Leslie. The name derives from a placename in Aberdeenshire, perhaps an anglicisation of an originally Gaelic leas celyn "holly-garden". In the United Kingdom, the name is spelled Leslie when given to boys, while for girls it is usually rendered as Lesley.

Foreman is a surname. Notable people with the surname include: