Thornton Hall

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Thornton Hall may refer to:

Thornton Hall, High Coniscliffe Grade I listed building in the United Kingdom

Thornton Hall is a privately owned 16th century manor house at High Coniscliffe, near Darlington, County Durham. It is a Grade I listed building.

Thornton Watlass Hall is a large Grade I listed Georgian country house in Thornton Watlass, North Yorkshire, England, some 3 miles (5 km) north of Masham.

Mountjoy Prison prison

Mountjoy Prison, founded as Mountjoy Gaol and nicknamed The Joy, is a medium security prison located in Phibsborough in the centre of Dublin, Ireland. It has the largest prison population in Ireland. The current prison warden is Brian Murphy.

See also

Thornton Academy

Thornton Academy is a co-educational, independent boarding and day school serving grades 9–12 located in Saco, Maine. Thornton Academy Middle School, a co-education private/public day school, serves grades 6-8 for Saco, Dayton, Arundel, Biddeford, and Kennebunk students.

Thornton Hough human settlement in United Kingdom

Thornton Hough is a village on the Wirral Peninsula, in Merseyside, England, of pre-Conquest origins. It was historically part of Cheshire. The village grew during the ownership of Joseph Hirst into a small model village and was later acquired by William Lever. Thornton Hough is roughly ten miles from Liverpool and ten miles from Chester and part of the Clatterbridge Ward of the Metropolitan Borough of Wirral in the parliamentary constituency of Wirral South. At the 2001 Census, Thornton Hough had 770 inhabitants of a total of 16,906 people living within the Clatterbridge ward.

Thornton Manor

Thornton Manor is a large house in the village of Thornton Hough, Wirral, Merseyside, England. It is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II* listed building. The house was first built in the middle of the 19th century and has been altered and extended in a number of phases since. From 1888 to the end of the 20th century the house was occupied by the Viscounts Leverhulme. It is now used as a conference and events centre, and a venue for weddings.

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Thornton, Buckinghamshire village and civil parish in the Aylesbury Vale district of Buckinghamshire

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New Hall may refer to:

Norley human settlement in United Kingdom

Norley is a village and civil parish in the unitary authority of Cheshire West and Chester and the ceremonial county of Cheshire, England. It lies to the north of Delamere Forest, near the village of Cuddington. The civil parish population at the 2011 census of 1,169. Its name is derived from Norlegh, which means "north clearing".

Rossall human settlement in United Kingdom

Rossall is a settlement in Lancashire, England and a suburb of the market town of Fleetwood. It is situated on a coastal plain called The Fylde. Blackpool Tramway runs through Rossall, with two stations: Rossall School on Broadway and Rossall Square on South strand.

Hough End Hall

Hough End Hall is a historic house now in Chorlton-cum-Hardy,, Manchester, North West England. It was built in 1596 during the reign of Queen Elizabeth I by Sir Nicholas Mosley, when he became Lord of the Manor of Manchester and of the dependent Manor of Withington. The Mosleys were an influential Mancunian family from the 16th century onwards, and prominent in the affairs of the Manchester district for two and a half centuries.

Hough, Cheshire human settlement in United Kingdom

Hough is a village and civil parish in the unitary authority of Cheshire East and the ceremonial county of Cheshire, England. The village is 3 miles (4.8 km) south of Crewe and 4 miles (6.4 km) east of Nantwich. The parish also includes part of the settlement of Goodalls Corner. The total population is a little over 800, measured at 808 in the 2011 Census. Nearby villages include Basford, Chorlton, Shavington, Weston and Wybunbury.

William Owen (architect) English architect, born 1846

William Owen was an English architect who practised in Warrington, which was at that time in Lancashire, England. His works were confined to Northwest England. Owen is best known for his collaboration with William Lever in the creation of the soap-making factory and associated model village at Port Sunlight in the Wirral Peninsula. Here he designed the factory, many of the workers' houses, public buildings and the church. Later Owen was joined by his son, Segar, as a partner. On his own, or in partnership, Owen designed houses, churches, banks, public houses, an infirmary, a school, and a concert hall.

Thornton Hough is a village in Wirral, Merseyside, England. It contains 39 buildings that are recorded in the National Heritage List for England as designated listed buildings. Of these, three are listed at Grade II*, the middle of the three grades, and the others are at Grade II, the lowest grade. The village was developed into a model village in the second half of the 19th century and the early 20th century by two industrialists, first by Joseph Hirst, a textile manufacturer from Yorkshire, and later by Lord Leverhulme, the soap manufacturer who also created the model village of Port Sunlight. Most of the listed buildings were constructed for them, including the two churches. The only listed building pre-dating the works of the industrialists are a public house, and Thornton Manor, which was greatly expanded by Lord Leverhulme.