Those Were the Days (comic strip)

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Those Were the Days is an American comic strip drawn by Art Beeman and debuted in 1954. [1] The strip compared life in earlier times, apparently the late 19th century or very early 20th century, with "modern life", at the time of the strip's popularity, the 1950s and 1960s. The title of the strip was printed in an antique typeface. Between the "olden days" panel and the "modern" panel were the words, "But Now - Wow!", emphasizing the contrast between mores of different generations. It was terminated in 1983.

Comic strip short serialized comics

A comic strip is a sequence of drawings arranged in interrelated panels to display brief humor or form a narrative, often serialized, with text in balloons and captions. Traditionally, throughout the 20th century and into the 21st, these have been published in newspapers and magazines, with horizontal strips printed in black-and-white in daily newspapers, while Sunday newspapers offered longer sequences in special color comics sections. With the development of the internet, they began to appear online as webcomics. There were more than 200 different comic strips and daily cartoon panels in South Korea alone each day for most of the 20th century, for a total of at least 7,300,000 episodes.

Mores customary behaviour

Mores was introduced from English into American English by William Graham Sumner (1840–1910), an early U.S. sociologist, to refer to social norms that are widely observed and are considered to have greater moral significance than others. Mores include an aversion for societal taboos, such as incest. The mores of a society usually predicate legislation prohibiting their taboos. Often, countries will employ specialized vice squads or vice police engaged in suppressing specific crimes offending the societal mores.

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