Thoughts of My Cats

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Thoughts of My Cats

Thoughts cats.jpg

First edition (UK)
Author Bruce Marshall
Country Scotland
Language English
Publisher Constable & Co. (UK)
Houghton Mifflin (US)
Publication date
1954
Media type Print (Hardback)
Pages 104

Thoughts of My Cats is a 1954 non-fiction book by Scottish writer Bruce Marshall.

Bruce Marshall British writer

Lieutenant-Colonel Claude Cunningham Bruce Marshall, known as Bruce Marshall was a prolific Scottish writer who wrote fiction and non-fiction books on a wide range of topics and genres. His first book, A Thief in the Night came out in 1918, possibly self-published. His last, An Account of Capers was published posthumously in 1988, a span of 70 years.

Synopsis

It is the story of the cats who adopted the Marshalls' villa at Cap d'Antibes when their less loving owners departed at the end of the season minus their pets.

Cat domesticated feline

The cat or domestic cat is a small carnivorous mammal. It is the only domesticated species in the family Felidae. The cat is either a house cat, kept as a pet, or a feral cat, freely ranging and avoiding human contact. A house cat is valued by humans for companionship and for its ability to hunt rodents. About 60 cat breeds are recognized by various cat registries.

The book has engaging photographs of the author and his feline family, and is a delightful and witty treatise on how to win --- and influence --- cats. [1]

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References

  1. Marshall, B: Thoughts of My Cats Constable and Company Ltd, London 1954.