Three's a Crowd (1969 film)

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Three's a Crowd
Genre Comedy
Written by Nate Monaster (teleplay)
Harry Winkler (teleplay)
Nate Monaster (story)
Directed byHarry Falk
Starring Larry Hagman
Jessica Walter
Theme music composer Tommy Boyce
Bobby Hart
Country of originUnited States
Original languageEnglish
Production
Producers Jon Epstein
Louis H. Goldstein (associate producer)
Cinematography Lothrop B. Worth
Editor William Martin
Running time90 min.
Production company Screen Gems
Distributor Sony Pictures Television
Release
Original network ABC
Original releaseDecember 2, 1969 (1969-12-02)

Three's a Crowd is a 1969 American made-for-television comedy film starring Larry Hagman, who was starring in the hit sitcom I Dream of Jeannie at the time. The film was directed by Harry Falk for Screen Gems, the production company behind I Dream of Jeannie. The film's title tune was written, performed and produced by Boyce and Hart, who wrote and produced several of the Monkees' hits [1] as well as songs for Little Anthony and the Imperials, Del Shannon, Fats Domino, Paul Revere and the Raiders, Chubby Checker and the theme song to Days of Our Lives . The duo also appeared with Hagman in an episode of I Dream of Jeannie . The film originally aired as the ABC Movie of the Week on December 2, 1969 . [2]

Contents

Plot

Jim Carson (Larry Hagman) is a pilot whose wife Ann (E.J. Peaker) disappears and is presumed dead. Seven years later, she re-appears. Meantime, Jim has met and married Jessica (Jessica Walter). He really loves both wives and hasn't the heart to tell either one of them about the other. They both throw a birthday party for him at the same time and in the same hotel, but on different floors. He tries to get away with his charade and finally enlists the aid of the elevator boy (Norman Fell). Jim goes to a psychiatrist (Harvey Korman) to try to figure out his "problem". The psychiatrist drools over both wives's pictures and tells Jim what a fool he is to want to give them up. Jim, who runs an air freight service between two cities, spends one night with Ann and the next with Jessica. Both women are physically active, having him doing all kinds of sports, and are just wearing him to a frazzle. That's when he goes to see the psychiatrist.

Cast

See also

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