Three-finger salute

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Three-finger salute may refer to any hand gesture where three fingers are extended away from the palm. Examples include:

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  1. "First Thailand, now Myanmar: Asia protesters borrow three-finger salute from Hunger Games". The Straits Times. February 4, 2021.

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Salute Gesture or action used to display respect

A salute is a gesture or other action used to display respect. When saluting a person, as distinct from a flag or a National Anthem or other symbolic melody, the gaze must be towards that person, also when returning a salute. Thus, the respectable salute includes a greeting. Not looking at the person, as with most gestured greetings, is likely to be interpreted as disrespectful or an eye deficiency. Salutes are primarily associated with armed forces and law enforcement, but other organizations, such as girl guides, and boy scouts and other civilians also use salutes.

The finger Hand gesture

In Western culture, "the finger" or the middle finger is an obscene hand gesture. The gesture communicates moderate to extreme contempt, and is roughly equivalent in meaning to "fuck me", "fuck you", "shove it up your ass/arse", "up yours" or "go fuck yourself". It is performed by showing the back of a hand that has only the middle finger extended upwards, though in some locales, the thumb is extended. Extending the finger is considered a symbol of contempt in several cultures, especially in the Western world. Many cultures use similar gestures to display their disrespect, although others use it to express pointing without intentional disrespect. The gesture is usually used to express contempt but can also be used humorously or playfully.

Roman salute Gesture

The Roman salute is a gesture in which the arm is fully extended, facing forward, with palm down and fingers touching. In some versions, the arm is raised upward at an angle; in others, it is held out parallel to the ground. In contemporary times, the former is widely considered a symbol of fascism that is commonly perceived to be based on a custom in ancient Rome. However, no Roman text gives this description, and the Roman works of art that display salutational gestures bear little resemblance to the modern Roman salute.

V sign Hand sign

The V sign is a hand gesture in which the index and middle fingers are raised and parted to make a V shape while the other fingers are clenched. It has various meanings, depending on the circumstances and how it is presented.

Two-finger salute

The two-finger salute is a salute given using only the middle and index fingers, while bending the other fingers at the second knuckle, and with the palm facing the signer. This salute is used by the Polish Armed Forces, other uniformed services, and, in some countries, the Cub Scouts.

The raised fist, or the clenched fist, is a long standing image of mixed meaning, at times a symbol of political solidarity, at times a symbol of intolerance or hate when used to foster incitement or discrimination against the normative Human Rights as defined in the The Universal Declaration of Human Rights. It is also a common symbol of communism and can also used as a salute to express unity, strength, or resistance.

Scout sign and salute

The three-finger salute is used by members of Scout and Guide organizations around the world when greeting other Scouts and in respect of a national flag at ceremonies. In most situations, the salute is made with the right hand, palm face out, the thumb holding down the little finger, and with the fingertips on the brow of the head. There are some variations of the salute between national Scouting organizations and also within some programme sections.

OK gesture Hand gesture

The OK gesture or OK sign or ring gesture is performed by connecting the thumb and index into a circle, and holding the other fingers straight or relaxed away from the palm. Commonly used by divers, it signifies "I am OK" or "Are you OK?" when underwater. In most English-speaking countries it denotes approval, agreement, and that all is well or "okay". In other contexts or cultures, similar gestures may have different meanings or connotations including those that are negative, offensive, financial, numerical, devotional, political, or purely linguistic.

Sign of the horns Hand gesture

The sign of the horns is a hand gesture with a variety of meanings and uses in various cultures. It is formed by extending the index and little fingers while holding the middle and ring fingers down with the thumb.

Three-finger salute (Serbian) Salute used in oath-taking

The three-finger salute, commonly known as the Serbian salute, is a salute which originally expressed the Holy Trinity, used in oath-taking, and a symbol of Serbian Orthodoxy, that today simply is an expression, a gesture, for ethnic Serbs and Serbia, made by extending the thumb, index, and middle fingers of one or both hands. The salute usually goes along with the Serbian flag, using several semantic layers to depict its historical meaning, while also being used a symbol of Serbian ethno-nationalism during the Guča Trumpet Festival.

the salute remains a distinctive sign for the ethnic Serb and a symbol for belonging to the Serbian nation.

Bras dhonneur Obscene gesture in Europe and Latin America

A bras d'honneur, Iberian slap, or Italian salute is an obscene gesture that communicates moderate to extreme contempt, and is roughly equivalent in meaning to "fuck me", "fuck you", "shove it up your ass/arse", "up yours" or "go fuck yourself", having the same meaning as giving the finger. It is most common in Romanic Europe, Latin America, Russia, Poland, Hungary, Bulgaria, Croatia, Turkey, Georgia, Québec, Ireland and in parts of Scotland. To make the gesture, an arm is bent in an L-shape, with the fist pointing upwards; the other hand then grips the biceps of the bent arm as it is emphatically raised to a vertical position.

Schwurhand Heraldic charge depicting the hand gesture that is used in Germanic Europe and neighboring countries

The Schwurhand is a heraldic charge depicting the hand gesture that is used in Germanic Europe and neighboring countries, when swearing an oath in court, in office or in swearing-in. The right hand is raised, with the index finger and middle finger extended upwards; the last two digits are curled downwards against the palm. The thumb is shown slightly curled or raised.

Wave (gesture)

A wave is a nonverbal communication gesture that consists of the movement of the hand and/or entire arm that people commonly use to greet each other, but it can also be used to say goodbye, acknowledge another's presence, call for silence, or deny someone. The different ways that humans communicate with one another are plentiful, but the wave gesture is one of the clearest examples of how researchers get a better understanding of how they are essential part to language and thought.

The Rabaa or Rabbi'ah sign - often stylized as R4BIA or less commonly as Rab3a - is a hand gesture and a sign that first appeared in late August 2013, thought to have originated from Turkey and used in social media and protest marches in Egypt. It is used by the Muslim Brotherhood and its supporters in Egypt in the wake of the overthrow of Mohamed Morsi, which occurred after anti-government protests calling for his removal. On July 9, 2014, a Brotherhood-affiliated organization declared August 14, the day when the sit-ins were dispersed, "World Rabia Day," in an attempt to garner support across numerous countries.

2014 Thai coup détat

On 22 May 2014, the Royal Thai Armed Forces, led by General Prayut Chan-o-cha, Commander of the Royal Thai Army (RTA), launched a coup d'état, the 12th since the country's first coup in 1932, against the caretaker government of Thailand, following six months of political crisis. The military established a junta called the National Council for Peace and Order (NCPO) to govern the nation.

Milk Tea Alliance Asian democracy and human rights movement

The Milk Tea Alliance is an online democratic solidarity movement made up of netizens from Hong Kong, Taiwan, Thailand, and Myanmar. It originally started as an internet meme, created in response to the increased presence of Chinese trolls and nationalist commentators on social media and has evolved into a dynamic multinational protest movement advocating democracy and human rights.

2020 Myanmar general election

General elections were held in Myanmar on 8 November 2020. Voting occurred in all constituencies, excluding seats appointed by or reserved for the military, to elect members to both the upper house- Amyotha Hluttaw and the lower house- Pyithu Hluttaw of the Assembly of the Union, as well as State and Regional Hluttaws (legislatures). Ethnic Affairs Ministers were also elected by their designated electorates on the same day, although only select ethnic minorities in particular states and regions were entitled to vote for them. A total of 1,171 national, state, and regional seats were contested in the election, with polling having taken place in all townships, including areas considered conflict zones and self-administered regions.

2021 Myanmar coup détat Military takeover of government in Myanmar

The 2021 Myanmar coup d'état began on the morning of 1 February 2021 when democratically elected members of Myanmar's ruling party, the National League for Democracy, were deposed by the Tatmadaw—Myanmar's military—which vested power in a stratocracy. The Tatmadaw proclaimed a year-long state of emergency and declared power had been vested in Commander-in-Chief of Defence Services Min Aung Hlaing. It declared the results of the November 2020 general election invalid and stated its intent to hold a new election at the end of the state of emergency. The coup d'état occurred the day before the Parliament of Myanmar was due to swear in the members elected at the 2020 election, thereby preventing this from occurring. President Win Myint and State Counsellor Aung San Suu Kyi were detained, along with ministers, their deputies and members of Parliament.

2021 Myanmar protests 2021 coup resistance movement in Myanmar

The 2021 Myanmar protests are domestic civil resistance efforts in Myanmar in opposition to the 2021 Myanmar coup d'état, which was staged by Min Aung Hlaing, the Commander-in-Chief of the Tatmadaw on 1 February 2021. As of 15 February 2021, at least 452 people have been detained in relation to the coup. Protesters have employed peaceful and nonviolent forms of protest, which include acts of civil disobedience, labour strikes, a military boycott campaign, a pot-banging movement, a red ribbon campaign, public protests, and formal recognition of the election results by elected representatives.