Three Times Lucky

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Three Times Lucky
Turnage Three Times Lucky cover.jpeg
AuthorSheila Turnage
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
Genre novel
Publisher The Penguin Group
Publication date
2012
Media typePrint
Pages312 pp
ISBN 9780142426050

Three Times Lucky is a 2013 New York Times Best Seller adolescent novel by author Sheila Turnage. Three Times Lucky was a Newbery Medal Honor Book in 2013. [1]

Contents

Characters

Critical reception

Many critics say Three Times Lucky is a one of a kind Southern-style novel. A writer for Kirkus Reviews claims that Sheila Turnage's first adolescent novel is "an engaging, spirit-lifting and unforgettable debut for young readers". [2] With a complex and multi-layered plot and its themes of romance, mystery and secret identities, all readers enjoy it. But some critics have mixed reviews. They believe it is hard to focus on reading when there too much plot. Throughout the novel, Turnage constantly introduces new characters, plots, and sub-plots which can cause readers to be confused about what the story is actually about. Jonathan Hunt of School Library Journal starts off by saying "the beginning is awfully slow", [3] suggesting that readers will have to plow through the first couple chapters before the novel starts to actually make sense. But Hunt reassures that "the story does pick up steam". [3] Carolyn Phelan of Booklist supports Hunt by saying "the pace quickens considerably as the mystery gains momentum, climaxing in an epic scene". [4]

Sequels

Three Times Lucky started the series of books called the Mo and Dale Mysteries. The Ghosts of Tupelo Landing came out in 2015, The Odds of Getting Even in 2017 and The Law of Finders Keepers in 2018.

Related Research Articles

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Whodunit complex, plot-driven variety of the detective story in which the audience is given the opportunity to engage in the same process of deduction as the protagonist throughout the investigation of a crime

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Crime fiction Genre of fiction focusing on crime

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<i>The Mysterious Affair at Styles</i> Detective novel by Agatha Christie (1920)

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<i>The Murder of Roger Ackroyd</i> 1926 mystery novel by Agatha Christie

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<i>The Sittaford Mystery</i> novel by Agatha Christie

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<i>Murder in Mesopotamia</i> book

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<i>The Clocks</i> detective novel by Agatha Christie

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<i>A Caribbean Mystery</i> novel by Agatha Christie

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<i>While the Patient Slept</i> (film) 1935 film by Ray Enright

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Sheila Turnage American writer

Sheila Turnage is an American author best known for writing Three Times Lucky, which received a Newbery Honor in 2013.

References

  1. "Newbery Medal and Honor Books: 2010s". American Library Association. Retrieved 28 October 2014.
  2. "THREE TIMES LUCKY by Sheila Turnage." Kirkus Reviews. Dial, 28 Mar. 2012. Web. 18 Nov. 2014.
  3. 1 2 Hunt, Jonathan. "Three Times Lucky." Heavy Medal. N.p., 21 Oct. 2012. Web. 18 Nov. 2014.
  4. Phelan, Carolyn. "Booklist Online." Three Times Lucky, by Sheila Turnage. Booklist, n.d. Web. 18 Nov. 2014.