Three radio theremin

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The Three Radio Theremin was originally created by Tomoya Yamamoto [1] . The theremin is constructed by tuning 3 separate radios to create a system that acts similar to a stand-alone theremin [2] [3] . The circuitry in each individual radio is used to functionally modulate the sound out of the third, producing similar tonal qualities as a theremin.

The following process can be used to produce the same effect:

  1. Find 3 Amplitude Modulated (AM) Radios
  2. Set 2 radios to 1145 kHz and the third to 1600 kHz
  3. Overlay the radios with the 1600 kHz radio being in between the two 1145 kHz radios.
  4. Solder the coil to the antenna
  5. Make an octave in 20 cm between hand and antenna

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References

  1. YAMAMOTO, Tomoya. "Super Theremin utilizing three radio sets « TOMOYA YAMAMOTO". www.tomoya.com. Retrieved 17 April 2018.
  2. SUZUKI, YURI. "Three Radio Theremin « YURI SUZUKI". yurisuzuki.com. Retrieved 22 December 2016.
  3. SUZUKI, YURI. "Three Radio Theremin « YURI SUZUKI". yurisuzuki.com. Retrieved 22 December 2016.