Three radio theremin

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The Three Radio Theremin was originally created by Tomoya Yamamoto . [1] The theremin is constructed by tuning 3 separate radios to create a system that acts similar to a stand-alone theremin. [2] The circuitry in each individual radio is used to functionally modulate the sound out of the third, producing similar tonal qualities as a theremin.

The following process can be used to produce the same effect:

  1. Find 3 sets of Amplitude Modulated (AM) Radios of superheterodyne receiver type
  2. Place set 3 radio between set1 and set 2
  3. Set 1 and Set 2 radios tuned to 1145 kHz and set 3 to 1600 kHz so that local oscillators of set 1 and 2 well received by set 3 radio
  4. Local oscillator of set 1 and 2 may produce beat sound in set 3
  5. Manipulate hand over set 1 antenna to change the frequency of beat sound
  6. Volume of beat sound reduced by covering set 3 radio with hand.


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References

  1. YAMAMOTO, Tomoya. "Super Theremin utilizing three radio sets «  TOMOYA YAMAMOTO". www.tomoya.com. Retrieved 17 April 2018.
  2. SUZUKI, YURI. "Three Radio Theremin «  YURI SUZUKI". yurisuzuki.com. Retrieved 22 December 2016.