Throwouts (dance)

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Throwouts are variations from Balboa and are also known as Toss-outs.

The Balboa is a swing dance that originated in Southern California during the 1920s and enjoyed huge popularity during the 1930s and 1940s. The term Balboa originally referred to a dance characterized by its close embrace and full body connection. It emphasizes rhythmic weight shifts and lead-follow partnership. Different dancers in the same region at the same time also danced "swing," a dance characterized by twists, turns, and open-position movement. Over time, these two dances merged and became collectively known as Balboa. The original Balboa dance is now referred to as Pure Balboa, and the original "Swing" dance is now referred to as Bal-Swing or L.A. Swing to differentiate it from other types of swing. Because of its emphasis on subtlety and partnering rather than flashy tricks, Balboa is considered more of a "dancer's dance" than a "spectator's dance."

The main idea is that the follower moves to arm's distance from the lead. Usually this is done from a comearound. On the 5-6, the lead lets go with his right arm, and the follow naturally moves apart. Then on count 7, the lead can begin another variation.

There are many Balboa swing out variations:


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