Ticker tape parade

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Ticker tape parade for presidential candidate Richard Nixon in New York in 1960 NixonTickerTapeParadeNYC1960.jpg
Ticker tape parade for presidential candidate Richard Nixon in New York in 1960
Ticker tape parade in New York City in honor of the Apollo 11 astronauts, August 1969 Apollo 11 ticker tape parade 1.jpg
Ticker tape parade in New York City in honor of the Apollo 11 astronauts, August 1969

A ticker tape parade is a parade event held in a built-up urban setting, allowing large amounts of shredded paper (originally actual ticker tape, but now mostly confetti) to be thrown from nearby office buildings onto the parade route, creating a celebratory effect by the snowstorm-like flurry. The concept originates from and is most usually associated with the United States, especially with New York City. Outside the United States, ticker tape is often associated with the 1978 FIFA World Cup held in Argentina. [1] [2] [3]

Parade procession of people

A parade is a procession of people, usually organized along a street, often in costume, and often accompanied by marching bands, floats, or sometimes large balloons. Parades are held for a wide range of reasons, but are usually celebrations of some kind. In Britain, the term parade is usually reserved for either military parades or other occasions where participants march in formation; for celebratory occasions, the word procession is more usual. In the Canadian Forces, the term also has several less formal connotations.

Paper thin, flexible material mainly used for writing upon, printing upon, drawing or for packaging

Paper is a thin material produced by pressing together moist fibres of cellulose pulp derived from wood, rags or grasses, and drying them into flexible sheets. It is a versatile material with many uses, including writing, printing, packaging, cleaning, decorating, and a number of industrial and construction processes. Papers are essential in legal or non-legal documentation.

Ticker tape digital communication media

Ticker tape was the earliest digital electronic communications medium, transmitting stock price information over telegraph lines, in use between around 1870 through 1970. It consisted of a paper strip that ran through a machine called a stock ticker, which printed abbreviated company names as alphabetic symbols followed by numeric stock transaction price and volume information. The term "ticker" came from the sound made by the machine as it printed.

Contents

History

The term originated in New York City after a spontaneous celebration held on October 28, 1886, during the dedication of the Statue of Liberty [4] and is still most closely associated with New York City. The term ticker tape originally referred to the use of the paper output of ticker tape machines, which were remotely driven devices used in brokerages to provide updated stock market quotes. The term ticker came from the sound made by the machine as it printed. [5]

New York City Largest city in the United States

The City of New York, usually called either New York City (NYC) or simply New York (NY), is the most populous city in the United States and thus also in the state of New York. With an estimated 2017 population of 8,622,698 distributed over a land area of about 302.6 square miles (784 km2), New York is also the most densely populated major city in the United States. Located at the southern tip of the state of New York, the city is the center of the New York metropolitan area, the largest metropolitan area in the world by urban landmass and one of the world's most populous megacities, with an estimated 20,320,876 people in its 2017 Metropolitan Statistical Area and 23,876,155 residents in its Combined Statistical Area. A global power city, New York City has been described as the cultural, financial, and media capital of the world, and exerts a significant impact upon commerce, entertainment, research, technology, education, politics, tourism, art, fashion, and sports. The city's fast pace has inspired the term New York minute. Home to the headquarters of the United Nations, New York is an important center for international diplomacy.

Statue of Liberty Colossal neoclassical sculpture on Liberty Island in New York Harbor

The Statue of Liberty is a colossal neoclassical sculpture on Liberty Island in New York Harbor in New York, in the United States. The copper statue, a gift from the people of France to the people of the United States, was designed by French sculptor Frédéric Auguste Bartholdi and its metal framework was built by Gustave Eiffel. The statue was dedicated on October 28, 1886.

Stock market public entity for the trading of company stocks and shares

A stock market, equity market or share market is the aggregation of buyers and sellers of stocks, which represent ownership claims on businesses; these may include securities listed on a public stock exchange, as well as stock that is only traded privately. Examples of the latter include shares of private companies which are sold to investors through equity crowdfunding platforms. Stock exchanges list shares of common equity as well as other security types, e.g. corporate bonds and convertible bonds.

In New York City, ticker tape parades are reserved for special occasions. Soon after the first such parade in 1886, city officials realized the utility of such events and began to hold them on triumphal occasions, such as the return of Theodore Roosevelt from his African safari, Gertrude Ederle swimming the English Channel, and Charles Lindbergh's trans-Atlantic flight. The first individual to be honored with a ticker tape parade was Admiral George Dewey, hero of the battle of Manila Bay, in 1899, when two million people came out to New York City. [6] Following World War II, several ticker tape parades were given in honor of victorious generals and admirals, including General Dwight D. Eisenhower and Admiral Chester Nimitz. Two of the longest and largest ticker tape parades were given for World War II and Korean War General Douglas MacArthur in 1951, after he was relieved of duty by President Harry S. Truman, and for astronaut John Glenn in 1962. [7] Golfing greats Bobby Jones (1921 and 1930) and Ben Hogan (1953) were honored with ticker tape parades after their British Open triumphs.

Roman triumph

The Roman triumph was a civil ceremony and religious rite of ancient Rome, held to publicly celebrate and sanctify the success of a military commander who had led Roman forces to victory in the service of the state or, originally and traditionally, one who had successfully completed a foreign war.

Theodore Roosevelt 26th president of the United States

Theodore Roosevelt Jr. was an American statesman, sportsman, conservationist and writer who served as the 26th president of the United States from 1901 to 1909. He previously served as the 25th vice president of the United States from March to September 1901 and as the 33rd governor of New York from 1899 to 1900. As a leader of the Republican Party during this time, he became a driving force for the Progressive Era in the United States in the early 20th century. His face is depicted on Mount Rushmore, alongside those of George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, and Abraham Lincoln. In polls of historians and political scientists, Roosevelt is generally ranked as one of the five best presidents.

Smithsonian–Roosevelt African Expedition

The Smithsonian–Roosevelt African Expedition was an expedition to Africa led by outgoing American president Theodore Roosevelt and outfitted by the Smithsonian Institution. Its purpose was to collect specimens for the Smithsonian's new Natural History museum, now known as the National Museum of Natural History. The expedition collected around 11,400 animal specimens which took Smithsonian naturalists eight years to catalog. Following the expedition, Roosevelt chronicled it in his book African Game Trails.

The section of lower Broadway through the Financial District that serves as the parade route for these events is colloquially called the "Canyon of Heroes". More than 200 black granite strips embedded in the sidewalks along the Canyon of Heroes list honorees of past ticker-tape parades. [8] By the early 21st century, such parades became far more infrequent, largely limited to championship sports teams, and celebrations of the return of astronauts and military troops.

Broadway (Manhattan) street in Manhattan

Broadway is a road in the U.S. state of New York. Broadway runs from State Street at Bowling Green for 13 mi (21 km) through the borough of Manhattan and 2 mi (3.2 km) through the Bronx, exiting north from the city to run an additional 18 mi (29 km) through the municipalities of Yonkers, Hastings-On-Hudson, Dobbs Ferry, Irvington, and Tarrytown, and terminating north of Sleepy Hollow in Westchester County.

Ticker tape technology became obsolete in the 1960s, as television and computers came into use for transmitting financial information. [5] Modern parades utilize waste office paper and toilet paper that have been cut using conventional paper shredders. [9] The city also distributes paper confetti. [10]

Paper shredder mechanical device used to cut paper into fine strips or pieces

A paper shredder is a mechanical device used to cut paper into either strips or fine particles. Government organizations, businesses, and private individuals use shredders to destroy private, confidential, or otherwise sensitive documents.

See also

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References

  1. "My World Cup: Osvaldo Ardiles (Argentina, 1978, 1982)". Lancashire Telegraph. 8 June 2010.
  2. "World Cup history: Argentina 1978". TalkTalk. Archived from the original on 20 September 2015. Retrieved 1 June 2015.
  3. "The story of the 1978 World Cup". BBC. 18 May 2010.
  4. "The Sights and Sightseers". The New York Times . October 29, 1886. Retrieved 2010-02-15.
  5. 1 2 Griffiths, Sarah (August 22, 2013). "Edison's famous ticker tape machine gets a modern makeover: Web developer invents gadget that prints TWEETS". Daily Mail .
  6. Laura Fitzpatrick "Brief History Ticker-Tape Parades." Time Magazine 6 November 2009
  7. "TICKER-TAPE PARADES: WHICH WERE BIGGEST?". New York Times. 29 October 1986. Retrieved 10 July 2015.
  8. Santos, Fernanda (11 June 2008). "Super Bowl-Winning Giants Get Canyon of Heroes Honor". The New York Times . Retrieved 4 August 2008. The plaque is one of the more than 200 granite strips in a route known as the Canyon of Heroes, marking those who have been honored by the city with ticker-tape parades.
  9. NYC Ticker-Tape Parade for U.S. Women’s Soccer Steps Off Friday
  10. Belson, Ken (February 7, 2008). "They Don’t Throw Paper Like They Used To". The New York Times.