Ticklish Rock

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Ticklish Rock, at ground level Ticklish Rock.jpg
Ticklish Rock, at ground level
Ticklish Rock, from above Above Ticklish Rock.jpg
Ticklish Rock, from above

Ticklish Rock is an unusual sandstone rock formation, located in Shrewsbury Township, Sullivan County, Pennsylvania. The brown and green sandstone formation, which stands at the edge of a steep cliff and resembles an upright hammer, consists of a large horizontal block, 3 feet high, 8 feet long, and 6 feet wide (0.9 x 2.4 x 1.8 m), balanced upon a thin, 18 in × 30 in (46 cm × 76 cm) pedestal.

Sandstone A clastic sedimentary rock composed mostly of sand-sized particles

Sandstone is a clastic sedimentary rock composed mainly of sand-sized mineral particles or rock fragments.

Outcrop visible exposure of bedrock or ancient superficial deposits on the surface of the Earth

An outcrop or rocky outcrop is a visible exposure of bedrock or ancient superficial deposits on the surface of the Earth.

Shrewsbury Township, Sullivan County, Pennsylvania Township in Pennsylvania, United States

Shrewsbury Township is a township in Sullivan County, Pennsylvania, United States. The population was 319 at the 2010 census.

Ticklish Rock is part of Pennsylvania's Catskill Formation, which was formed during the Devonian period. The outcrop itself is the result of more recent uneven weathering, which removed all but the pedestal from under the block.

Catskill Formation

The Devonian Catskill Formation or the Catskill Clastic wedge is a unit of mostly terrestrial sedimentary rock found in Pennsylvania and New York. Minor marine layers exist in this thick rock unit. It is equivalent to the Hampshire Formation of Maryland, West Virginia, and Virginia.

The Devonian is a geologic period and system of the Paleozoic, spanning 60 million years from the end of the Silurian, 419.2 million years ago (Mya), to the beginning of the Carboniferous, 358.9 Mya. It is named after Devon, England, where rocks from this period were first studied.

Weathering Breaking down of rocks, soil and minerals as well as artificial materials through contact with the Earths atmosphere, biota and waters

Weathering is the breaking down of rocks, soil, and minerals as well as wood and artificial materials through contact with the Earth's atmosphere, water, and biological organisms. Weathering occurs in situ, that is, in the same place, with little or no movement, and thus should not be confused with erosion, which involves the movement of rocks and minerals by agents such as water, ice, snow, wind, waves and gravity and then being transported and deposited in other locations.

Trailhead Ticklish Rock Trailhead.jpg
Trailhead

Remarks

A block of flat-lying, brown and green sandstone (Catskill Formation, Devonian age), 3 by 8 feet in cross section, 6 feet thick, resting on a pedestal that is 18 by 30 inches. The outcrop is on the rim of the Allegheny Ridge; an excellent example of differential weathering.

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Old Red Sandstone assemblage of rocks in the North Atlantic region

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Little Pine State Park

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Hamilton Group

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Bedford Shale

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Waterfalls in Ricketts Glen State Park waterfalls in Ricketts Glen State Park in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania

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The Ridgeley sandstone is a sandstone or quartzite of Devonian age found in the Appalachian Mountains of Pennsylvania, Maryland, West Virginia, and Virginia, United States. The Ridgeley is fine-grained, siliceous, calcareous in its lower strata, sometimes fossiliferous, and sometimes locally pebbly or conglomeritic. Varying in thickness from 12 to 500 feet, this rock slowly erodes into white quartz sand that often washes or blows away, but sometimes accumulates at large outcrops. When freshly broken, the rock is white, but outcrop surfaces are often stained yellowish by iron oxides.

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West Creek (Pennsylvania) tributary of Fishing Creek in Columbia County, Pennsylvania

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Lead Run tributary of East Branch Fishing Creek in Sullivan County, Pennsylvania

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Trout Run (East Branch Fishing Creek tributary) tributary of East Branch Fishing Creek in Sullivan County, Pennsylvania

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Big Run (East Branch Fishing Creek tributary) tributary of East Branch Fishing Creek in Sullivan County, Pennsylvania

Big Run is a tributary of East Branch Fishing Creek in Sullivan County, Pennsylvania, in the United States. It is approximately 2.4 miles (3.9 km) long and flows through Davidson Township. Its watershed has an area of 1.38 square miles (3.6 km2). The stream has a low pH and poor water quality, although that could potentially be remedied. The main rock formations in the area are the Catskill Formation, the Huntley Mountain Formation, and the Burgoon Sandstone. The main soil associations in the vicinity of the stream are the Deep-Wellsboro-Oquaga association, the Oquaga association, and the Norwich association.

Pigeon Run is a tributary of Sullivan Branch in Sullivan County, Pennsylvania, in the United States. It is approximately 1.3 miles (2.1 km) long and flows through Davidson Township. Its watershed has an area of 0.78 square miles (2.0 km2). The stream has a low pH and sometimes has poor water quality, although that could potentially be remedied. The main rock formations in the area are the Catskill Formation, the Huntley Mountain Formation, and the Burgoon Sandstone. The main soil associations in the vicinity of the stream are the Deep-Wellsboro-Oquaga association, the Norwich association, the Morris association, and the Oquaga association.

Hunts Run is a tributary of Sullivan Branch in Sullivan County, Pennsylvania, in the United States. It is approximately 0.5 miles (0.80 km) long and flows through Davidson Township. Its watershed has an area of 0.40 square miles (1.0 km2). The stream has a low pH and poor water quality. The main rock formations in the area are the Huntley Mountain Formation, and the Burgoon Sandstone. The main soil associations in the vicinity of the stream are the Deep-Wellsboro-Oquaga association, the Morris association, and the Oquaga association.

Exmoor Group

The Exmoor Group is a late Devonian to early Carboniferous lithostratigraphic group in southwest England whose outcrop extends from Croyde in north Devon east across Exmoor to Minehead in west Somerset. The group comprises the following formations the:

References

Pennsylvania Department of Internal Affairs (1939), Ticklish Rock - One of State's curious formations, Pennsylvania Department of Internal Affairs Monthly Bulletin 7, no. 11, p. 3-4.

http://www.lat-long.com/ShowDetail-43539-Pennsylvania-Ticklish_Rock.html

Coordinates: 41°21′02″N76°38′53″W / 41.35056°N 76.64806°W / 41.35056; -76.64806

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.