Tickson Music

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Tickson Music was a Hollywood-based music publishing company; songwriters signed to Tickson Music included members of The Byrds, and writer Bill Martin.

Hollywood Neighborhood of Los Angeles in California, United States

Hollywood is a neighborhood in the central region of Los Angeles, California, notable as the home of the U.S. film industry including several of its historic studios. Its name has come to be a shorthand reference for the industry and the people associated with it.

In the music industry, a music publisher is responsible for ensuring the songwriters and composers receive payment when their compositions are used commercially. Through an agreement called a publishing contract, a songwriter or composer "assigns" the copyright of their composition to a publishing company. In return, the company licenses compositions, helps monitor where compositions are used, collects royalties and distributes them to the composers. They also secure commissions for music and promote existing compositions to recording artists, film and television.

The Byrds American rock band

The Byrds were an American rock band, formed in Los Angeles, California in 1964. The band underwent multiple lineup changes throughout its existence, with frontman Roger McGuinn remaining the sole consistent member, until the group disbanded in 1973. Although they only managed to attain the huge commercial success of contemporaries like the Beatles, the Beach Boys, and the Rolling Stones for a short period in the mid-60s, the Byrds are today considered by critics to be nearly as influential as those bands. Their signature blend of clear harmony singing and McGuinn's jangly twelve-string Rickenbacker guitar was immediately absorbed into the vocabulary of popular music and has continued to be influential up to the present day.

Tickson Music owned Martin's song "All of Your Toys", which The Monkees chose as their first song to record with the whole band playing. The record unfortunately couldn't be released, as parent company Screen Gems had a rule that all Monkees songs had to be Screen Gems property, and Tickson Music wouldn't sell the copyright. (Martin signed a new publishing contract with Screen Gems.)

"All of Your Toys" is a song by Bill Martin, a friend of Michael Nesmith of The Monkees, who recorded the song in 1967.

The Monkees American–British pop group

The Monkees are an American rock and pop band originally active between 1966 and 1971, with reunion albums and tours in the decades that followed. They were formed in Los Angeles in 1965 by Bob Rafelson and Bert Schneider specifically for the American television series The Monkees, which aired from 1966 to 1968. The musical acting quartet was composed of Americans Micky Dolenz, Michael Nesmith, and Peter Tork; and the English actor and singer Davy Jones. The band's music was initially supervised by producer Don Kirshner, backed by the songwriting duo of Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart.

Screen Gems

Screen Gems, Inc. is an American film production and distribution studio that is a division of Sony Pictures' Motion Picture Group, a subsidiary of Japanese multinational conglomerate Sony. It has served several different purposes for its parent companies over the decades since its incorporation. The label currently specializes in genre films, mainly horror.

Another song published by Tickson Music was "You Showed Me", written by Byrds Roger McGuinn and Gene Clark and covered by The Turtles; former Monkees producer Chip Douglas introduced the Turtles to the song.

You Showed Me 1968 single by The Turtles

"You Showed Me" is a song written by Jim McGuinn and Gene Clark of the Byrds in 1964. It was recorded by the Turtles and released as a single at the end of 1968, becoming the group's last big hit in the U.S. The song has also been covered by a number of other bands and artists over the years, including the Lightning Seeds, Salt-n-Pepa, and Lutricia McNeal.

Roger McGuinn American singer-songwriter and guitarist

James Roger McGuinn, known professionally as Roger McGuinn and previously as Jim McGuinn, is an American musician. He is best known for being the frontman of the Byrds. He was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame for his work with the Byrds.

Gene Clark American musician

Harold Eugene "Gene" Clark was an American singer-songwriter and founding member of the folk rock band the Byrds. He was the Byrds' principal songwriter between 1964 and early 1966, writing most of the band's best-known originals from this period, including "I'll Feel a Whole Lot Better", "She Don't Care About Time", and "Set You Free This Time". Although he did not achieve commercial success as a solo artist, Clark was in the vanguard of popular music during much of his career, prefiguring developments in such disparate subgenres as psychedelic rock, baroque pop, newgrass, country rock, and alternative country.


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