Tietkens expedition of 1889

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Photograph of William Tietkens held in the State Library of South Australia William H. Tietkens.jpg
Photograph of William Tietkens held in the State Library of South Australia

The Tietkens expedition of 1889 was led by William Tietkens. It covered territory west of Alice Springs to the vicinity of the Western Australian border. [1]

Contents

Expedition members

The expedition members were: [2]

Dates

The expedition took place from March to July 1889. [2]

Purpose and outcome

Tietkens hoped to discover a supply channel to Lake Amadeus from hills to the north-west, expecting that this might open a reliable route to the north-west coast settlements. He succeeded in proving that it did not exist.

Support

The South Australian branch of the Royal Geographical Society of Australasia was instrumental in mounting the expedition and appointing Tietkens as leader.

Discoveries

This expedition discovered Lake Macdonald (Karrkurutinyja), the Kintore Range, Mount Leisler, Mount Rennie, the Cleland Hills, defined the western borders of Lake Amadeus, and photographed Uluru (Ayers Rock) and Kata Tjuta (Mount Olga) for the first time.

Features named by Tietkens, with the source of the name, include: [2]

Route

William Tietkens expedition 1889 Tietkens Exploration.svg
William Tietkens expedition 1889

The attached map shows the main features of the route followed.

Means of travel

The caravan consisted of twelve camels, sufficient to carry the expedition members, provisions for up to four months and water for a lesser period. [2]

Accomplishments

The expedition collected new species of plants and rock samples allowing the South Australian government geologist to compile a 'geological sketch' of the country traversed.

Specimens of 250 plant species were collected, although only 8 were new to science, [3] and in 1890, Ferdinand von Mueller and Ralph Tate named Eremophila tietkensii in his honour. [4] [5]

Publications

The following publications contain information derived from this expedition:

Recognition

. Tietkens was elected a fellow of the Royal Geographical Society on his return.

Related Research Articles

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Ferdinand von Mueller German-Australian botanist (1825-1896)

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Lake Amadeus

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Algernon Hawkins Thomond Keith-Falconer, 9th Earl of Kintore, 9th Lord Keith of Inverurie and Keith Hall, Chief of Clan Keith,, was a British politician and colonial governor.

William Tietkens English born Australian explorer

William Harry Tietkens, known as "Harry Tietkens", explorer and naturalist, was born in England and emigrated to Australia in 1859. Tietkens was second in command to Ernest Giles on expeditions to Central Australia in 1873 and on a journey from Beltana, South Australia to Perth, Western Australia in 1875. In 1889 Tietkens led his own expedition west of Alice Springs to the vicinity of the Western Australian border. This expedition discovered Lake Macdonald, the Kintore Range, Mount Leisler, Mount Rennie, the Cleland Hills, defined the western borders of Lake Amadeus, and photographed Uluru and Kata Tjuta for the first time. The expedition collected new species of plants and rock samples allowing the South Australian government geologist to compile a 'geological sketch' of the country traversed. Tietkens was elected a fellow of the Royal Geographical Society on his return. Specimens of 250 plant species were collected, although only 8 were new to science, and in 1890, Ferdinand von Mueller and Ralph Tate named Eremophila tietkensii in his honour.

Lake Macdonald

Lake Macdonald is an ephemeral lake that straddles the border between Western Australia and the Northern Territory. It lies south of Lake Mackay, and south-west of Kintore, Northern Territory. Lying in country inhabited by Indigenous Australians for many thousands of years, it was first visited by Europeans in 1889, as part of an expedition supported by the Royal Geographical Society of South Australia. The expedition was led by William Tietkens; its activities included the first known photographs taken of Uluru. The lake is named after the secretary of the Victorian branch of the Geographical Society at that time. The area has been investigated for the mining of potash.

<i>Eremophila maculata</i> Species of plant

Eremophila maculata, also known as spotted emu bush or spotted fuchsia-bush, is a plant in the figwort family Scrophulariaceae, and is endemic to Australia. It is the most widespread of its genus in nature and probably the most frequently cultivated Eremophila. It is a spreading, often densely branched shrub with variable leaf shape and flower colour, but the other features of the flowers such as the size and shape of the parts are consistent. The inside of the flower is often, but not always, spotted.

<i>Eremophila bignoniiflora</i> Species of plant

Eremophila bignoniiflora, commonly known as Bignonia emu bush, creek wilga, dogwood, eurah, gooramurra, kurumbimi and river argee is a plant in the figwort family Scrophulariaceae and is endemic to the Northern Territory and all mainland states of Australia. It is a spreading, weeping shrub or small tree with long, strap-like leaves. Its leaves are among the longest in the Eremophila genus and the flowers are also relatively large, reflecting their adaptation to pollination by birds.

<i>Eremophila latrobei</i> Species of plant

Eremophila latrobei, commonly known as crimson turkey bush, native fuchsia, Latrobe's emu bush, grey fuchsia bush, warty fuchsia bush and Georgina poison bush is a flowering plant in the figwort family, Scrophulariaceae and is endemic to Australia. It is an erect, highly branched shrub with usually linear leaves and red to purple-red flowers and which occurs in all mainland states, including the Northern Territory but excluding Victoria.

<i>Eremophila denticulata</i>

Eremophila denticulata, also known as toothed eremophila, toothed poverty bush and Fitzgerald eremophila, is a flowering plant in the figwort family, Scrophulariaceae and is endemic to the south-west of Western Australia. It is an erect shrub with red flowers and leaves that have toothed margins.

<i>Eremophila clarkei</i>

Eremophila clarkei, commonly known as turpentine bush, is a flowering plant in the figwort family, Scrophulariaceae and is endemic to Western Australia, South Australia and the Northern Territory. It is a shrub which is variable in form, but usually with narrow leaves and white or pale pink flowers. It is similar to Eremophila georgei and Eremophila granitica.

Sandy Blight Junction Road

The Sandy Blight Junction Road is a remote outback track in Australia joining the Great Central Road, Western Australia and Gary Junction Road, Northern Territory. It was built under the direction of legendary surveyor Len Beadell as part of a network of roads for the Weapons Research Establishment at Woomera, South Australia. It is located approximately 500 km (310 mi) west of Alice Springs.

Mount Unapproachable

Mount Unapproachable is an isolated mountain in the Northern Territory of Australia located in the locality of Petermann on the northern side of Lake Neale in the territory's southwest. It is about 505 metres (1,657 ft) above sea level. The area is remote: the nearest towns are Kaltukatjara some 116 kilometres (72 mi) away, Kintore some 135 kilometres (84 mi) away and Yulara 138 kilometres (86 mi) away. The mountain is mostly made of sandstone.

William Vincent Fitzgerald

William Vincent Fitzgerald, was an Australian botanist. He described five genera and about 210 species of plants from Western Australia, including 33 Acacia and several Eucalyptus species. He also collected for other botanists such as Ferdinand von Mueller and Joseph Maiden and was known through his work on orchids. Eucalyptus fitzgeraldii was named for him by William Blakely.

<i>Eremophila behriana</i> Species of plant

Eremophila behriana is a flowering plant in the figwort family, Scrophulariaceae and is endemic to South Australia. It was one of the plants collected on the 1858 - 1859 Babbage expedition to explore areas north of Adelaide and was later described by Ferdinand von Mueller. It is a small shrub, usually with egg-shaped, serrated leaves and lilac to purple flowers with hairs on the lower petal lobe.

Eremophila elderi, commonly known as aromatic emu bush, is a flowering plant in the figwort family, Scrophulariaceae. It is endemic to central Australia where it grows near the border between Western Australia, South Australia and the Northern Territory. It is an erect, aromatic shrub with sticky leaves and branches and usually pale coloured to white flowers. Its specific epithet (elderi) honours an early Australian businessman, Thomas Elder.

<i>Eremophila gibsonii</i> Species of plant

Eremophila gibsonii is a flowering plant in the figwort family, Scrophulariaceae and is endemic to Australia. It is a sticky, glabrous, rounded shrub with narrow leaves and white to lilac-coloured flowers and which occurs in Western Australia, South Australia and the Northern Territory.

<i>Eremophila goodwinii</i>

Eremophila goodwinii, commonly known purple fuchsia bush and Goodwin's emu bush is a flowering plant in the figwort family, Scrophulariaceae and is endemic to Australia. It is a small, spreading or erect shrub with most parts sticky due to the presence of resin, tapering leaves and pale lilac to mauve flowers. It occurs in New South Wales, the Northern Territory and Queensland.

<i>Eremophila tietkensii</i>

Eremophila tietkensii is a flowering plant in the figwort family, Scrophulariaceae and is endemic to Australia. It is a rounded to flat-topped shrub with grey-green leaves, usually pinkish-purple sepals and mauve, pink or lilac-coloured petals. It is mostly found in Western Australia but also occurs in the far west of the Northern Territory.

Mount Leisler

Mount Leisler is the highest point in the Kintore Range in the south-west of the Northern Territory of Australia. Its elevation is 897 metres (2,943 ft) AHD .

References

  1. 1 2 Joy, William (1964). The Explorers. Adelaide: Rigby Ltd. p. 72. ISBN   0-85179-112-3.
  2. 1 2 3 4 "Journal of the Central Australia Exploring Expedition".
  3. 1 2 von Mueller, Ferdinand; Tate, Ralph (1890). "List of Plants collected during Mr. Tietkens' Expedition into Central Australia, 1889". Transactions and Proceedings and Report, Royal Society of South Australia. 13: 95. Retrieved 24 March 2016.
  4. 1 2 Chinnock, R.J. (Bob) (2007). Eremophila and allied genera : a monograph of the plant family Myoporaceae (1st ed.). Dural, NSW: Rosenberg. pp. 425–427. ISBN   9781877058165.
  5. 1 2 Brown, Andrew; Buirchell, Bevan (2011). A field guide to the eremophilas of Western Australia (1st ed.). Hamilton Hill, W.A.: Simon Nevill Publications. p. 275. ISBN   9780980348156.