Tom Devanney

Last updated
Tom Devanney
Born
Thomas Devanney
Occupation Writer
Years active1990–present

Thomas Devanney is an American writer and producer. He has written several episodes of the animated series Family Guy . [1]

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Devanney also wrote briefly for The Fresh Prince of Bel Air , and was a producer on Perfect Strangers in the 1991–92 season. Devanney and his Perfect Strangers producing colleagues (Shari Hearn, Bob Keyes) went on to produce the Fox sitcom Shaky Ground , which ran during the 1992–93 season and starred Matt Frewer, Robin Riker and Jennifer Love Hewitt.

Devanney met fellow Family Guy writer Chris Sheridan while writing for the 1993 series Thea . While not only writing for several episodes of Family Guy including the famous "You Have AIDS" song, as well as the Fresh Prince of Bel Air, he voiced Marilyn Manson in an episode of Family guy. In the 2020 episode "CutawayLand" (S19 E4), the Griffins travel to a land of the past episode's cut aways and you hear the famous AIDS song, at which Peter says that the patient's name is Tom Devanney.

Family Guy

Devanney joined Family Guy in 2005. He has since written multiple episodes, including:

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