Tom Walsh (rugby league)

Last updated
Tom Walsh
Tom Walsh - Hunslet.jpeg
Personal information
Full nameTom Walsh
Playing information
Position Forward
Club
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
≤1905–≥08 Hunslet

Tom Walsh was a professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1900s and 1910s. He played at club level for Hunslet, as a forward (prior to the specialist positions of; prop , hooker , second-row , loose forward), during the era of contested scrums.

Rugby league Full-contact sport played by two teams of thirteen players on a rectangular field

Rugby league is a full-contact sport played by two teams of thirteen players on a rectangular field. One of the two codes of rugby, it originated in Northern England in 1895 as a split from the Rugby Football Union over the issue of payments to players. Its rules progressively changed with the aim of producing a faster, more entertaining game for spectators.

Hunslet R.L.F.C.

Hunslet R.L.F.C. is a professional rugby league club in Hunslet, South Leeds, West Yorkshire, England, which plays in Betfred League 1. The club was founded in 1973 as New Hunslet, they became Hunslet in 1979 and the club were the Hunslet Hawks between 1995 and 2016.

Hooker (rugby league)

Hooker is one of the positions in a rugby league football team. Usually wearing jersey number 9, the hooker is one of the team's forwards. During scrums the hooker plays in the front row, and the position's name comes from their role of 'hooking' or 'raking' the ball back with the foot. For this reason the hooker is sometimes referred to as the rake.

Contents

Playing career

Challenge Cup Final appearances

Tom Walsh played as a forward, i.e. number 13, in Hunslet's 14-0 victory over Hull F.C. in the 1907–08 Challenge Cup Final during the 1907–08 season at Fartown Ground, Huddersfield on Saturday 25 April 1908, in front of a crowd of 18,000.

Hull F.C. rugby league football club

Hull Football Club, commonly referred to as Hull or Hull F.C., is a professional rugby league football club established in 1865 and based in West Hull, East Riding of Yorkshire, England. The club plays in the Super League competition and were known as Hull Sharks from 1996–99.

The Challenge Cup is a knockout rugby league cup competition organised by the Rugby Football League, held annually since 1896, with the exception of 1915–1919 and 1939–1940. It involves amateur, semi-professional and professional clubs.

Fartown Ground

Fartown Ground, is a sports ground located in the Huddersfield suburb of Fartown in West Yorkshire, England and is predominantly famous for being the home ground of Huddersfield Rugby League Club from 1878 to 1992. It was the scene of many great games, including the Challenge Cup finals of 1908 and 1910, several Challenge Cup semi finals and international matches.

County Cup Final appearances

Tom Walsh played as a forward, i.e. number 10, in Hunslet's 13-3 victory over Halifax in the 1905–06 Yorkshire County Cup Final during the 1905–06 season at Park Avenue, Bradford on Saturday 2 December 1905, and played as a forward, i.e. number 8, in the 17-0 victory over Halifax in the 1907–08 Yorkshire County Cup Final during the 1907–08 season at Headingley Rugby Stadium, Leeds on Saturday 21 December 1907.

Halifax R.L.F.C.

Halifax R.L.F.C. is a professional rugby league club in Halifax, West Yorkshire, which formed in 1873. Halifax were one of the original twenty-two rugby clubs that formed the Northern Rugby Football Union in 1895. They have been Rugby League Champions four times and have won the Challenge Cup five times. They were known as the Halifax Blue Sox between 1996 and 2002.

The RFL Yorkshire Cup is a rugby league county cup competition for teams in Yorkshire. Starting in 1905 the competition ran, with the exception of 1915 to 1918, until the 1992–93 season, when it folded due to fixture congestion. In 2019, the competition was relaunched as a pre-season tournament.

Historically, English rugby league clubs competed for the Lancashire Cup and the Yorkshire Cup, known collectively as the county cups. The leading rugby clubs in Yorkshire had played in a cup competition for several years prior to the schism of 1895. However, the Lancashire authorities had refused to sanction a similar tournament, fearing it would lead to professionalism.

All Four Cups, and "The Terrible Six"

Tom Walsh was a member of Hunslet's 1907–08 season All Four Cups winning team, the Forwards were known as "The Terrible Six" they were; Tom Walsh, Harry Wilson, Jack Randall, Bill "Tubby" Brookes, Bill Jukes, and John Willie Higson. [1]

The 1907–08 Northern Rugby Football Union season was the 13th season of rugby league football.

All Four Cups

Winning All Four Cups referred to winning all four competitions available to a British rugby league side in the top division between 1907 and 1970. The cups available to win were the Rugby Football League Championship, Challenge Cup, county league and county cup. The feat was achieved on three occasions.

Harry Wilson (rugby league) English rugby union and rugby league footballer

Harry Wilson was an English rugby union, and professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1890s and 1900s. He played representative level rugby union (RU) for Yorkshire, and at club level for Methley RFC, Castleford RUFC, Rothwell RFC, and Morley R.F.C., and representative level rugby league (RL) for Great Britain, England and Yorkshire, and at club level for Hunslet, as a forward, during the era of contested scrums.

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References

  1. "Hunslet remembered - Leisure and sport". hunslet.org. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012.