Tommy Atkins in the Park

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Tommy Atkins in the Park
TommyAtkinsinthePark.jpg
Screenshot from the film
Directed by Robert W. Paul
Produced byRobert W. Paul
CinematographyRobert W. Paul
Production
company
Paul's Animatograph Works
Release date
  • August 1898 (1898-08)
Running time
47 secs
CountryUnited Kingdom
Language Silent

Tommy Atkins in the Park is an 1898 British short black-and-white silent comedy film, directed by Robert W. Paul, featuring couple courting in a park who are forced to use desperate measures to get rid of a stout matron who interrupts them. The film was a remake of Alfred Moul's The Soldier's Courtship (1896). It is included on the BFI DVD R.W. Paul: The Collected Films 1895-1908 and a clip is featured in Paul Merton's interactive guide to early British silent comedy How They Laughed on the BFI website. [1] [2] [3]

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References

  1. Brooke, Michael. "Tommy Atkins in the Park". BFI Screenonline. Retrieved 24 April 2011.
  2. "Tommy Atkins in the Park". BFI Film & TV Database. Archived from the original on 23 October 2012. Retrieved 24 April 2011.
  3. Merton, Paul. "How They Laughed". BFI Screenonline. Retrieved 24 April 2011.