Tongeren Group

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The Tongeren Group is a lithostratigraphic unit (a sequence of rock strata) in the subsurface of Belgium. It consists of shallow marine, epicontinental and/or continental clays and sands from the late Eocene to early Oligocene epochs (between 37 and 30 million years old).

Contents

The Belgian Tongeren Group correlates with the Dutch Tongeren Formation. The name was introduced by André Hubert Dumont in 1849.

Subdivision

The Tongeren Group is subdivided into three formations. From top to bottom these are:

Stratigraphic relations

In northwest Belgium the Tongeren Group (represented in that area mostly by the Zelzate Formation) is stratigraphically lying on top of the Maldegem Formation (middle Eocene clay and sand). This formation is lacking in the east of the country, where the Tongeren Group is found directly on top of rocks with older ages, like the Landen Group.

The Tongeren Group is usually overlain by deposits of the late Oligocene Rupel Group.

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Ieper Group

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The Tongeren Formation is a geologic formation in the subsurface of the Netherlands. The formation consists of shallow marine, epicontinental and continental sediments, predominantly clay and sand from the late Eocene and early Oligocene epochs. The Tongeren Formation is part of the Middle North Sea Group and correlates with the Tongeren Group from Belgian stratigraphy.

The Aalter Formation is a geologic formation in the subsurface of northwest Belgium. The formation consists of marine clay and sand, deposited in the shallow sea that covered northern and central Belgium in the Eocene epoch.

The Gentbrugge Formation is a geologic formation in the west of Belgium. The formation crops out in East- and West-Flanders and also occurs in the subsurface of the province of Antwerpen. It consists of marine clay, silt and sand, deposited in the shallow sea that covered northern Belgium during the Ypresian age.

The Tielt Formation is a geologic formation in the subsurface of Belgium. The formation crops out in the north of Hainaut, in the southern and central parts of West- and East Flanders and in Walloon and Flemish Brabant. It consists of marine very fine sand and silt, deposited in the shallow sea that covered Belgium during the middle and late Ypresian age.

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The Maldegem Formation is a geologic formation in the Belgian subsurface. The formation consists of alternating marine clay and sand strata, deposited during the late Eocene.

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