Tony Aitken

Last updated
Tony Aitken
Born (1946-06-20) 20 June 1946 (age 74)
NationalityBritish
OccupationActor
Years active1968–present

Tony Aitken (born 20 June 1946) is an English actor, known for playing a variety of parts in popular television programmes.

Contents

He attended Belmont Abbey School, Hereford, 1959–64. He was active in the amateur dramatic society, appearing in many revues, plays and Gilbert and Sullivan productions. He acted with Neville Buswell another student at the school. Trained as a Drama and Art Teacher at St. Mary's University College, London 1964–67.

Over a forty five year career in theatre and TV, he has appeared regularly in series such as The Sweeney(Thin Ice)’', Porridge , The Mistress , Agatha Christie's Poirot , Holby City , Casualty , End of Part One and No. 73 , in films such as Robin Hood Junior , Jabberwocky , Quincy's Quest and The Remains of the Day in which he played the Postmaster.

His best-known role is perhaps as the "Merry Balladeer" in the closing titles of Blackadder II , in which he also played the madman ("pity poor Tom") in "Money". [1] [ disputed ] In addition to his acting career, he now runs a broadcast audio studio, producing and voicing radio and TV commercials. [2] In 2011 he played the part of solicitor "Ben Dean" in several episodes of Coronation Street . He played "Professor Aubrey" in the Feature Film "The Arbiter" 2013.

Filmography

YearTitleRoleNotes
1975Robin Hood JuniorJugge
1977 Jabberwocky Flagellant
1979 Quincy's Quest Teddy / Father Christmas
1987 Hearts of Fire Reporter #1
1993 The Remains of the Day Postmaster
2013The ArbiterAubrey

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References

  1. "Blackadder II – Blackadder Hall". Blackadder Hall. Archived from the original on 27 September 2011. Retrieved 28 November 2019.
  2. http://www.tonyaitken.co.uk