Tony Oliver (footballer)

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Tony Oliver
Personal information
Full nameAnthony John Oliver [1]
Date of birth (1967-09-22) 22 September 1967 (age 53)
Place of birth Portsmouth, England
Playing position(s) Goalkeeper
Youth career
1984–1986 Portsmouth
Senior career*
YearsTeamApps(Gls)
1986–1987 Portsmouth 0 (0)
Bristol Rovers (loan) 0 (0)
1987–1988 Brentford 11 (0)
1988–1991 Weymouth
Dorchester Town
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only

Anthony John Oliver (born 22 September 1967) is an English retired professional football goalkeeper who played in the Football League with Brentford. [1] He played non-league football for Weymouth and Dorchester Town and later became a goalkeeping coach at the latter club. [2] [3]

Career statistics

ClubSeasonLeagueFA CupLeague CupOtherTotal
DivisionAppsGoalsAppsGoalsAppsGoalsAppsGoalsAppsGoals
Brentford 1987–88 [4] Third Division 110000000110
Career total110000000110

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During the 1990–91 English football season, Brentford competed in the Football League Third Division. Five wins in the final six matches of the season propelled the Bees from mid-table into the play-offs, where the club was defeated by Tranmere Rovers in the semi-finals.

During the 1920–21 English football season, Brentford competed in the Football League Third Division. It was Brentford's inaugural season in the Football League and ended with the club successfully applying for re-election.

During the 1922–23 English football season, Brentford competed in the Football League Third Division South and finished in 14th place.

During the 1923–24 English football season, Brentford competed in the Football League Third Division South and finished in 17th place.

During the 1924–25 English football season, Brentford competed in the Football League Third Division South. After finishing in 21st place, the club successfully applied for re-election. The 41 goals scored during the season is the fewest in club history.

During the 1926–27 English football season, Brentford competed in the Football League Third Division South. In Harry Curtis' first season as manager, the club finished 11th and advanced to the fifth round of the FA Cup for the first time.

During the 1937–38 English football season, Brentford competed in the Football League First Division. In the league, the Bees matched the previous season's finish of 6th and advanced to the 6th round of the FA Cup for the first time in club history. In 2013, the Brentford supporters voted 1937–38 as the club's second-best season.

During the 1939–40 English football season, Brentford competed in the Football League, playing three matches before competitive football was suspended due to the outbreak of the Second World War. The club played in three unofficial wartime competitions for the remainder of the season – groups B and C of the Football League South and the Football League War Cup.

During the 1940–41 English football season, Brentford competed in the Football League South, due to the cessation of competitive football for the duration of the Second World War. Though the Bees finished well down in the league placings, the club enjoyed some measure of success in the London War Cup, finishing as runners-up to Reading.

During the 1941–42 English football season, Brentford competed in the London League, due to the cessation of competitive football for the duration of the Second World War. Despite scoring over 80 goals in what proved to be a forgettable league season, the Bees won the London War Cup with what is as of December 2020, the club's only victory at Wembley Stadium.

During the 1918–19 English football season, Brentford competed in the London Combination, due to the cessation of competitive football for the duration of the First World War. Buoyed by larger crowds after the Armistice, Brentford finished the season as champions of the London Combination.

During the 1962–63 English football season, Brentford competed in the Football League Fourth Division for the first time in the club's history. 67 goals from former international forwards John Dick, Billy McAdams and Johnny Brooks helped fire the Bees to the division title and an immediate return to the Third Division.

During the 1968–69 English football season, Brentford competed in the Football League Fourth Division. Off the back of 18 months of extreme financial problems, the club finished in mid-table.

During the 1973–74 English football season, Brentford competed in the Football League Fourth Division. A dreadful season, marred by infighting at boardroom level, resulted in a 19th-place finish, Brentford's lowest in the Football League since the 1925–26 season.

During the 1974–75 English football season, Brentford competed in the Football League Fourth Division. After a poor first half of the season, manager Mike Everitt was sacked and replaced by John Docherty, who produced a strong run of results to finish the campaign in 8th place.

During the 1980–81 English football season, Brentford competed in the Football League Third Division. In a mid-table season, the Bees drew a club-record 19 league matches.

References

  1. 1 2 Haynes, Graham; Coumbe, Frank (2006). Timeless Bees: Brentford F.C. Who's Who 1920–2006. Harefield: Yore Publications. p. 119. ISBN   978-0955294914.
  2. Croxford, Mark; Lane, David; Waterman, Greville (2011). The Big Brentford Book of the Eighties. Sunbury, Middlesex: Legends Publishing. pp. 368–369. ISBN   978-1906796716.
  3. "Player Archive". THE TERRAS. Retrieved 24 January 2018.
  4. White, Eric, ed. (1989). 100 Years Of Brentford. Brentford FC. p. 399. ISBN   0951526200.