Treaty of Corbeil (1326)

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The Treaty of Corbeil (1326) renewed the Auld Alliance between France and Scotland. It confirmed the obligation of each state to join the other in declaring war if either was attacked by England. The deputation from Scotland (then under the rule of Robert the Bruce) was led by Thomas Randolph, 1st Earl of Moray. [1]

Auld Alliance Alliance between France and Scotland

The Auld Alliance was an alliance made in 1295 between the kingdoms of Scotland and France. The alliance was formed for the purpose of controlling England's numerous invasions. The Scots word auld, meaning old, has become a partly affectionate term for the long-lasting alliance between the two countries. It remained until the signing of the Treaty of Edinburgh in 1560.

Thomas Randolph, 1st Earl of Moray Earl of Moray, 1332

Thomas Randolph, Earl of Moray was a soldier and diplomat in the Wars of Scottish Independence, who later served as regent of Scotland.

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References

  1. Ronald McNair Scott: Robert the Bruce, King of Scots, Hutchinson & Co 1982, p 216