Triple play (disambiguation)

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A triple play is a baseball play in which three outs are made as a result of continuous action without any intervening errors or pitches between outs.

In baseball, a triple play is the rare act of making three outs during the same continuous play.

Triple play may also refer to:

Triple play (telecommunications) marketing term in telecommunications

In telecommunications, triple play service is a marketing term for the provisioning, over a single broadband connection, of two bandwidth-intensive services, broadband Internet access and television, and the latency-sensitive telephone. Triple play focuses on a supplier convergence rather than solving technical issues or a common standard. However, standards like G.hn might deliver all these services on a common technology.

Triple Play (FIRST) 2005 FIRST Robotics Competition game

Triple Play was the name of the 2005 season FIRST Robotics Competition game.

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Unassisted triple play

In baseball, an unassisted triple play occurs when a defensive player makes all three outs by himself in one continuous play, without his teammates making any assists. Neal Ball was the first to achieve this in Major League Baseball (MLB) under modern rules, doing so on July 19, 1909. For this rare play to be possible there must be no outs in the inning and at least two runners on base, normally with the runners going on the pitch. An unassisted triple play usually consists of a hard line drive hit directly at an infielder for the first out, with that same fielder then able to double off one of the base runners and tag a second for the second and third outs.

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Heroes may refer to:

Three strikes or 3 Strikes may refer to: