Trygve Nygaard

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Trygve Nygaard
TrygveNygaard01.jpg
Personal information
Full nameTrygve Nygaard
Date of birth (1975-08-19) 19 August 1975 (age 45)
Place of birth Haugesund, Norway
Height 1.80 m (5 ft 11 in)
Position(s) Midfielder
Senior career*
YearsTeamApps(Gls)
1991–1995 Vard Haugesund
1996–1998 Haugesund
1999–2008 Viking 171 (15)
2009–2013 Haugesund 130 (1)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league onlyand correct as of 22 July 2015

Trygve Nygaard (born 19 August 1975) is a retired Norwegian footballer.


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