USS La Vallette

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Two ships of the United States Navy have borne the name USS La Vallette, named in honor of Rear Admiral Elie A. F. La Vallette.

Elie Augustus Frederick La Vallette was one of the first rear admirals appointed in the United States Navy when Congress created the rank in July 1862.

USS LaVallette (DD-315) was a Clemson-class destroyer built for the United States Navy during World War I.

<i>Clemson</i>-class destroyer ship class

The Clemson class was a series of 156 destroyers which served with the United States Navy from after World War I through World War II.

Destroyer Type of warship

In naval terminology, a destroyer is a fast, maneuverable long-endurance warship intended to escort larger vessels in a fleet, convoy or battle group and defend them against smaller powerful short-range attackers. They were originally developed in the late 19th century by Fernando Villaamil for the Spanish Navy as a defense against torpedo boats, and by the time of the Russo-Japanese War in 1904, these "torpedo boat destroyers" (TBDs) were "large, swift, and powerfully armed torpedo boats designed to destroy other torpedo boats". Although the term "destroyer" had been used interchangeably with "TBD" and "torpedo boat destroyer" by navies since 1892, the term "torpedo boat destroyer" had been generally shortened to simply "destroyer" by nearly all navies by the First World War.

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<i>Fletcher</i>-class destroyer 1940s class of destroyers of the United States Navy

The Fletcher class was a class of destroyers built by the United States during World War II. The class was designed in 1939, as a result of dissatisfaction with the earlier destroyer leader types of the Porter and Somers classes. Some went on to serve during the Korean War and into the Vietnam War.

USS <i>La Vallette</i> (DD-448) destroyer

USS La Vallette (DD-448) was a World War II-era Fletcher-class destroyer in the service of the United States Navy. She was the second Navy ship named after Rear Admiral Elie A. F. La Vallette.

Three ships in the United States Navy have been named USS Evans, the first two for Robley D. Evans, and the third for Ernest E. Evans.

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USS <i>Chevalier</i> (DD-451) destroyer

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Federal Shipbuilding and Drydock Company

The Federal Shipbuilding and Drydock Company was a United States shipyard, active from 1917 to 1948. It was founded during World War I to build ships for the United States Shipping Board. During World War II, it built ships as part of the U.S. Government's Emergency Shipbuilding program. Operated by a subsidiary of the United States Steel Corporation, the shipyard was located at Kearny Point where the mouth of the Hackensack River meets Newark Bay in the Port of New York and New Jersey. The shipyard site is now part of River Terminal, a massive distribution facility that is partially a foreign trade zone.

USS <i>Timmerman</i> (DD-828) Gearing-class destroyer

USS Percival (DD-452) redirects here.

Maynard W. Tollberg (1904–1943) was a United States Navy sailor killed in action during World War II. He received a posthumous Navy Cross for his actions.