USS Ruff (AMc-59)

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History
US flag 48 stars.svgUnited States
Ordered: as Speaker
Laid down: 1940
Launched: 24 April 1941
Acquired: 31 December 1940
In service: 31 October 1941
Out of service: 23 January 1946
Struck: 7 February 1946
Fate: disposed of, 29 August 1947
General characteristics
Displacement: 340 tons
Length: 98 ft 6 in (30.02 m)
Beam: 24 ft (7.3 m)
Draught: 11 ft (3.4 m)
Speed: 10.0 knots
Complement: 17
Armament: two .50 cal (12.7 mm) machine guns

USS Ruff (AMc-59) was a coastal minesweeper acquired by the U.S. Navy for the dangerous task of removing mines from minefields laid in the water to prevent ships from passing.

Coastal minesweeper is a term used by the United States Navy to indicate a minesweeper intended for coastal use as opposed to participating in fleet operations at sea.

Contents

The first ship to be named Ruff by the Navy, AMc-59, originally named Speaker, was laid down in 1940 by Martinolich Shipbuilding Co., San Diego, California; acquired by the Navy 31 December 1940; named Ruff and designated AMc-59 on 5 March 1941; launched 24 April 1941; sponsored by Miss Martha Jane Shown; and placed in service 31 October 1941, Ens. W. H. Roberts, USNR, in command.

World War II service

Assigned the 14th Naval District, Ruff was escorted to Pearl Harbor where she arrived 11 March 1942 for duty. A coastal minesweeper equipped with acoustical, magnetic and "O" type gear, she operated in the Hawaiian Islands throughout the war. From January 1943 through September, she was stationed at the section base at Bishops' Point, Oahu, Hawaii. She remained with the Hawaiian local defense forces through September 1945.

Pearl Harbor harbor on the island of Oahu, Hawaii

Pearl Harbor is a lagoon harbor on the island of Oahu, Hawaii, west of Honolulu. It has been long visited by the Naval fleet of the United States, before it was acquired from the Hawaiian Kingdom by the U.S. with the signing of the Reciprocity Treaty of 1875. Much of the harbor and surrounding lands is now a United States Navy deep-water naval base. It is also the headquarters of the United States Pacific Fleet. The U.S. government first obtained exclusive use of the inlet and the right to maintain a repair and coaling station for ships here in 1887. The attack on Pearl Harbor by the Empire of Japan on December 7, 1941, was the immediate cause of the United States' entry into World War II.

Hawaiian Islands An archipelago in the North Pacific Ocean, currently administered by the US state of Hawaii

The Hawaiian Islands are an archipelago of eight major islands, several atolls, numerous smaller islets, and seamounts in the North Pacific Ocean, extending some 1,500 miles from the island of Hawaiʻi in the south to northernmost Kure Atoll. Formerly the group was known to Europeans and Americans as the Sandwich Islands, a name chosen by James Cook in honor of the then First Lord of the Admiralty John Montagu, 4th Earl of Sandwich. The contemporary name is derived from the name of the largest island, Hawaii Island.

Oahu The third-largest of the Hawaiian Islands and site of the state capital Honolulu

Oʻahu, known as "The Gathering Place", is the third-largest of the Hawaiian Islands. It is home to roughly one million people—about two-thirds of the population of the U.S. state of Hawaiʻi. The state capital, Honolulu, is on Oʻahu's southeast coast. Including small associated islands such as Ford Island and the islands in Kāneʻohe Bay and off the eastern (windward) coast, its area is 596.7 square miles (1,545.4 km2), making it the 20th-largest island in the United States.

Ruff was placed out of service at San Diego 23 January 1946, was struck from the Navy list 7 February 1946, and released to the Maritime Commission for disposal 29 August 1947.

See also

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References

This article incorporates text from the public domain Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships .The entry can be found here.

The public domain consists of all the creative works to which no exclusive intellectual property rights apply. Those rights may have expired, been forfeited, expressly waived, or may be inapplicable.

<i>Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships</i> book

The Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships (DANFS) is the official reference work for the basic facts about ships used by the United States Navy.