Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships

Last updated
Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships
Danfs.jpg
Author James Longuemare Mooney
PublisherNavy Dept., Office of the Chief of Naval Operations, Naval History Division
Publication date
1959–1991
OCLC 2794587

The Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships (DANFS) is the official reference work for the basic facts about ships used by the United States Navy.

Contents

When the writing project was developed the parameters for this series were designed to cover only commissioned US Navy ships with assigned names. If the ship was not assigned a name it was not included in the histories written for the series. [1] In addition to the ship entries, DANFS and the online links have been expanded to include appendices on small craft, histories of Confederate Navy ships, and various essays related to naval ships.

Forewords and introductions

Foreword and introduction passages for many editions were written by big names from naval command history from Arleigh Albert Burke [2] to Elmo Russell Zumwalt, Jr. [3] and others.

Authors

Publication data

VolumeDateShipsNotes
I1959A–BOut of print
II1963C–FOut of print
III1968G–KOut of print
IV1969L–M
V1970N–QOut of print
VI1976R–S
VII1981T–V
VIII1981W–ZOut of print
I-A1991AOut of print
Hazegray A–ZHistories end at dates above
Naval History and Heritage Command A–ZHistories being brought up to date

DANFS was published in print by the Naval Historical Center (NHC) as bound hardcover volumes, ordered by ship name, from Volume I (A–B) in 1959 to Volume VIII (W–Z) in 1981. Several volumes subsequently went out of print. In 1991 a revised Volume I Part A, covering only ship names beginning with A, was released. Work continues on revisions of the remaining volumes.

Volunteers at the Hazegray website undertook to transcribe the DANFS and make it available on the World Wide Web. The project goal is a direct transcription of the DANFS, with changes limited to correcting typographical errors and editorial notes for incorrect facts in the original. In 2008 the NHC was re-designated as the Naval History and Heritage Command (NHHC). It has developed an online version of DANFS (see External links section below) through a combination of optical character recognition (OCR) and hand transcription. The NHHC is slowly updating its online DANFS to correct errors and take into account the gap in time between the print publication and the present date. NHHC prioritizes updates as follows: ships currently commissioned, ships commissioned after the original volume publication, ships decommissioned after original volume publication, and finally updates to older ships. [11] The NHHC has begun a related project to place Ship History and Command Operations Reports online at their DANFS site.

Reference use

As the DANFS is a work of the U.S. government, its content is in the public domain, and the text is often quoted verbatim in other works (including in some cases Wikipedia articles). Many websites organized by former and active crew members of U.S. Navy vessels include a copy of their ships' DANFS entries.

The Dictionary limits itself largely to basic descriptions and brief operational notes, and includes almost no analysis or historical context.

See also

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References

  1. "LSM and LSM(R) Histories". DANFS. Naval History and Heritage Command, US Navy. Archived from the original on 2015-06-15.
  2. 1 2 Burke, Arleigh Albert (1991), Foreword, Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships, by Mooney, James Longuemare, Naval History Division (ed.), I—Part A, Washington, D.C.: United States Government Printing Office, p. viii, hdl:2027/mdp.39015024791587, LCCN   91028049, OCLC   2475490, archived from the original on 2015-06-13
  3. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Zumwalt, Elmo Russell (1976), Foreword, Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships, by Mooney, James Longuemare; Bowen-Hassell, Everett Gordon; Devlin, Robert J.; Loughlin, Mary F.; Morison, Samuel Loring; Patton, John M., Naval History Division (ed.), V, Washington, D.C.: United States Government Printing Office, p. v, hdl:2027/mdp.39015081726344, LCCN   60060198, OCLC   2475490, archived from the original on 2015-06-13
  4. 1 2 3 Burke, Arleigh Albert (1959), Foreword, Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships, by Slaymaker, Richard P.; Sullivan, John P.; Smiley, Walter P., Naval History Division (ed.), I, Washington, D.C.: United States Government Printing Office, hdl:2027/mdp.39015081726351, LCCN   60060198, OCLC   769804820, archived from the original on 2015-06-13
  5. 1 2 3 4 Anderson, George Whelan (1963), Foreword, Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships, by Vail, Esther Handelman; Lawrence, Alma R.; Hazard, Roberta L.; Thomas, Jesse B., Naval History Division (ed.), II, Washington, D.C.: United States Government Printing Office, hdl:2027/mdp.39015040299755, LCCN   60060198, OCLC   769804820, archived from the original on 2015-06-13
  6. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Nitze, Paul Henry (1968), Foreword, Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships, by Johnson, Clayton F.; Roberts, John C.; Iwanowski, Raymond J.; Stewart, James V.; Schrader, Joan A.; Reilley, John C., Naval History Division (ed.), III, Washington, D.C.: United States Government Printing Office, hdl:2027/uva.35007004873851, LCCN   60060198, OCLC   861247907, archived from the original on 2015-06-13
  7. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Moorer, Thomas Hinman (1969), Foreword, Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships, by Mooney, James Longuemare; Stewart, James V.; Loughlin, Mary F.; Schrader, Joan A.; Morison, Samuel Loring; Devlin, Robert J.; Suran, Frank; Sorenson, Priscilla, Naval History Division (ed.), IV, Washington, D.C.: United States Government Printing Office, hdl:2027/mdp.39015040299771, LCCN   60060198, OCLC   313519467, archived from the original on 2015-06-13
  8. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Holloway, James L. (1976), Foreword, Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships, by Mooney, James Longuemare; Loughlin, Mary F.; Mann, Raymond A.; Reilley, John C.; Kennerly, Roland S.; Townsend, Christopher; Morison, Samuel Loring, Naval History Division (ed.), VI, Washington, D.C.: United States Government Printing Office, LCCN   60060198, OCLC   861247578
  9. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Hayward, Thomas Bibb (1981), Foreword, Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships, by Cressman, Robert J.; Kennedy, Christopher N.; Kennerly, Roland S.; MacFarlane, Suzanne; Mann, Raymond A.; Parsons, Luann; Ponsolle, Barbara; Reilley, John C.; Schuster, Theresa M., Mooney, James Longuemare; Naval History Division (eds.), VII, Washington, D.C.: United States Government Printing Office, LCCN   60060198, OCLC   861247578
  10. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Hidalgo, Edward (1981), Foreword, Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships, by Cressman, Robert J.; Kennedy, Christopher N.; Kennerly, Roland S.; MacFarlane, Suzanne; Mann, Raymond A.; Parsons, Luann; Ponsolle, Barbara; Reilley, John C.; Schuster, Theresa M., Mooney, James Longuemare; Naval History Division (eds.), VIII, Washington, D.C.: United States Government Printing Office, LCCN   60060198, OCLC   313519630
  11. "Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships – Editorial Note". Archived from the original on April 11, 2010. Retrieved 2006-10-29.