USS Taurus

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USS Taurus is a name used more than once by the U.S. Navy, after the constellation Taurus:

Constellation one of the 88 divisions of the celestial sphere, defined by the IAU, many of which derive from traditional asterisms

A constellation is a group of stars that forms an imaginary outline or pattern on the celestial sphere, typically representing an animal, mythological person or creature, a god, or an inanimate object.

Taurus (constellation) zodiac constellation straddling the celestial equator

Taurus is one of the constellations of the zodiac, which means it is crossed by the plane of the ecliptic. Taurus is a large and prominent constellation in the northern hemisphere's winter sky. It is one of the oldest constellations, dating back to at least the Early Bronze Age when it marked the location of the Sun during the spring equinox. Its importance to the agricultural calendar influenced various bull figures in the mythologies of Ancient Sumer, Akkad, Assyria, Babylon, Egypt, Greece, and Rome.

USS <i>Taurus</i> (AF-25)

USS Taurus (AF-25), formerly SS San Benito, was a refrigerated banana boat of the United Fruit Company that may have been the first merchant ship to be built with turbo-electric transmission. From October 1942 to December 1945 she was a United States Navy stores ship in the Pacific Ocean theatre of World War II. She was scrapped in 1953.

Cargo ship ship or vessel that carries cargo, goods, and materials onboard from one port to another

A cargo ship or freighter ship is a merchant ship that carries cargo, goods, and materials from one port to another. Thousands of cargo carriers ply the world's seas and oceans each year, handling the bulk of international trade. Cargo ships are usually specially designed for the task, often being equipped with cranes and other mechanisms to load and unload, and come in all sizes. Today, they are almost always built by welded steel, and with some exceptions generally have a life expectancy of 25 to 30 years before being scrapped.

USNS <i>Taurus</i> (T-AK-273)

USNS Taurus (T-AK-273) was a vehicle landing ship built for the United States Navy. The lone ship of her class, she was named for the constellation Taurus, and was the second U.S. Naval vessel to bear the name.

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USS <i>Taurus</i> (PHM-3)

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USS <i>Cutlass</i> (SS-478)

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USS <i>Baya</i> (SS-318) Balao-class submarine

USS Baya (SS/AGSS-318), a Balao-class submarine, was a ship of the United States Navy named for the baya.

USS <i>Entemedor</i> (SS-340)

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USS <i>Ingraham</i> (DD-444)

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USNS <i>Mission Buenaventura</i>

SS Mission Buenaventura was a Type T2-SE-A2 tanker built for the United States Maritime Commission during World War II. After the war she was acquired by the United States Navy as USS Mission Buenaventura (AO-111). Later the tanker transferred to the Military Sea Transportation Service as USNS Mission Buenaventura (T-AO-111). The lead ship in her class of fleet oilers, she was named for Mission San Buenaventura located in Ventura, California.

USS <i>Alamance</i> (AKA-75) Tolland-class attack cargo ship

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USS <i>Stag</i> (AW-1)

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USS <i>Rockford</i> (PF-48)

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USS <i>Covington</i> (PF-56)

USS Covington (PF-56), a Tacoma-class frigate, was the third ship of the United States Navy to be named for Covington, Kentucky. Covington, with a United States Coast Guard crew, served as a weather ship off Newfoundland through early 1946. She was decommissioned in April 1946 and turned over to the U.S. Coast Guard and commissioned the same day as USCGC Covington (PF-56) and remained in service through September. She was returned to the U.S. Navy at that time and placed in reserve. In April 1947, she was struck from the Naval Vessel Register and, in August, sold to the Ecuadorian Navy. As BAE Guayas (E-21), she served as the flagship of the Ecuadorian Navy from her acquisition through 1967. She was decommissioned in 1972 and stricken in 1974.

USS <i>Pasig</i> (AW-3) water distilling ship

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USS <i>Coronis</i> (ARL-10)

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USS <i>Tarantula</i> (SP-124)

USS Tarantula (SP-124) was a patrol boat in the United States Navy. She was named after the tarantula.

USS <i>Wassuc</i> (CMc-3)

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USS Edward H. Allen (DE-531) was a John C. Butler-class destroyer escort acquired by the U.S. Navy during World War II. The primary purpose of the destroyer escort was to escort and protect ships in convoy, in addition to other tasks as assigned, such as patrol or radar picket.

References

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<i>Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships</i> book

The Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships (DANFS) is the official reference work for the basic facts about ships used by the United States Navy.