Unaccompanied Sonata and Other Stories

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Unaccompanied Sonata and Other Stories
OSCUnaccompanied.jpg
First edition
Author Orson Scott Card
Cover artistLucinda Cowell
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
Genre Science fiction, Fantasy
Publisher Dial Press
Publication date
1980
Media typePrint (hardback & paperback)
Pages272
ISBN 0-8037-9175-5
OCLC 6626526
813/.54 19
LC Class PS3553.A655 U5

Unaccompanied Sonata and Other Stories (1980) is a collection of short stories by American writer Orson Scott Card. Although not purely science fiction and definitely not hard science fiction, the book contains stories that have a futuristic angle or are purely works of fantasy set in current times. All the stories except “The Porcelain Salamander” were first published elsewhere before appearing in the Unaccompanied Sonata collection. All eleven of these stories were later published in Maps in a Mirror .

Contents

Story list

The short stories in this book are:

See also


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