Universal Hint System

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The Universal Hint System, better known by the acronym UHS, is a form of strategy guide used for computer and video games, created by Jason Strautman in 1988. The system is designed to provide hints for solving specific parts of games without including premature spoilers. The strategy guides are primarily distributed in a UHS file format, readable using a UHS reader program.

An acronym is a word or name formed as an abbreviation from the initial components of a phrase or a word, usually individual letters and sometimes syllables.

Strategy guides are instruction books that contain hints or complete solutions to specific video games. The line between strategy guides and walkthroughs is somewhat blurred, with the former often containing or being written around the latter. Strategy guides are often published in print, both in book form and also as articles within video game magazines. In cases of exceptionally popular game titles, guides may be sold through more mainstream publication channels, such as bookstores or even newsstands. Some publishers also sell E-Book versions on their websites.

1988 has seen many sequels and prequels in video games and several new titles such as Super Contra, Super Mario Bros 2,Assault and Altered Beast, and Super Mario Bros 3

Contents

Readers

Since the system's creation, UHS readers have been made available for various platforms, including DOS, Apple Macintosh and Microsoft Windows. The current versions of the official readers are proprietary software products. An official Internet website, UHSWeb went online in 1998, allowing access to UHS guides via web browsers, including text-based web browsers such as Lynx. [1]

DOS group of closely-related PC-compatible operating systems

DOS is a family of disk operating systems, hence the name. DOS primarily consists of MS-DOS and a rebranded version under the name IBM PC DOS, both of which were introduced in 1981. Other later compatible systems from other manufacturers include DR-DOS (1988), ROM-DOS (1989), PTS-DOS (1993), and FreeDOS (1998). MS-DOS dominated the x86-based IBM PC compatible market between 1981 and 1995.

Microsoft Windows is a group of several graphical operating system families, all of which are developed, marketed, and sold by Microsoft. Each family caters to a certain sector of the computing industry. Active Windows families include Windows NT and Windows Embedded; these may encompass subfamilies, e.g. Windows Embedded Compact or Windows Server. Defunct Windows families include Windows 9x, Windows Mobile and Windows Phone.

Proprietary software, also known as "closed-source software", is a non-free computer software for which the software's publisher or another person retains intellectual property rights—usually copyright of the source code, but sometimes patent rights.

In 2006, a platform-independent open source reader written in Java, OpenUHS, began development. As of 2008, it fully supports all hint formats.

Reception

Chuck Miller of Computer Gaming World in 1993 called UHS "a nifty gaming utility that I wish would receive greater, perhaps even universal, support in the gaming community", stating "I heartily recommend the Universal Hint System as an adventurer's resource par excellence". [2]

<i>Computer Gaming World</i> American video game magazine

Computer Gaming World (CGW) was an American computer game magazine published between 1981 and 2006.

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UHS may refer to:

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References

  1. "UHS: About the UHS". Official UHS website. Retrieved September 25, 2006.
  2. Miller, Chuck (October 1993). "Shareware For The Adventurer's Backpack". Computer Gaming World. p. 52. Retrieved 25 March 2016.