Up0-interface

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The Up0-Interface is an integrated services digital network (ISDN) interface used in private networks. It is derived from the UK0-Interface used in public networks.

Telecommunications network network to enable telecommunication between different terminals

A telecommunications network is a collection of terminal nodes in which links are connected so as to enable telecommunication between the terminals. The transmission links connect the nodes together. The nodes use circuit switching, message switching or packet switching to pass the signal through the correct links and nodes to reach the correct destination terminal. Each terminal in the network usually has a unique address so messages or connections can be routed to the correct recipients. The collection of addresses in the network is called the address space. Examples of telecommunications networks are:

In public networks, the maximum cable length of an U bus is between 4 and 8 km, and the maximum length of an S0-bus is 900 meters for Point-to-Point configuration and about 150-300m for point-to-multipoint configurations. The Up0-bus has, depending on cable quality, a reach of between 2 and 4 km, far more than the S0-bus. This allows the use of ISDN telephone equipment in large private networks. Unlike the S0-bus, the Up0-bus runs at half duplex; that is, both sides alternate in sending and receiving.

While the S0-bus allows for several ISDN device connections (up to 8), the Up0-bus can connect only two devices, one at each end of the cable.

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