Vitilla

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Children playing vitilla, 2011 Vitilla.png
Children playing vitilla, 2011

Vitilla is a popular variation of stickball played primarily in the Dominican Republic and areas in the United States with large Dominican populations. [1] [2]

Contents

Overview

Overall rules and baserunning is roughly similar to basic forms of baseball, but there are only two bases in addition to home plate, only two or three fielders, a broomstick is used as a bat and a large plastic water bottle cap, called la vitilla, is used instead of a ball. The game also has aspects of Cricket, in that there are no walks or looking strike counts and strikeouts can be made by hitting a target behind the batter. The vitilla disk is difficult to hit, since it can float like a disk and can spin wildly at very high velocity, making for unpredictable fielding. The skill and coordination required in vitilla is credited with giving Dominican Major League Baseball players an advantage in hitting and fielding. [3] The game evolved from Dominican stickball in the 1970s, and had its first formal tournament in 2009. [4]

General rules

As a young street sport, there are no formal rules or governing sports authority to set rules. Beteyah, a company that makes vitilla equipment has suggested rules, [5] and another source of rules derives from the Red Bull Clasico De Vitilla tournaments. [3] Terminology is generally in Spanish, the primary language of most players.

Here is a list of ways vitilla differs from ordinary baseball:

See also

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References

  1. Wagner, James (6 Oct 2017). "Dominican Players Sharpen Their Skills With a Broomstick and Bottle Cap". New York Times. Retrieved 16 November 2017.
  2. Chiusano, Scott (22 September 2015). "Grab your brooms and save your plastic caps, because Vitilla is sweeping through New York City". New York Daily News. Retrieved 18 November 2017.
  3. 1 2 "The Clasico De Vitilla: A stickball-style tournament that just might be harder than baseball". Cut4. Major League Baseball. Retrieved 16 November 2017.
  4. Llenas, Bryan. "Vitilla, Dominican stickball using broomstick and bottle cap, starts hitting in U.S." Fox News Sports. Retrieved 16 November 2017.
  5. "How to Play". Beteyah. Retrieved 18 November 2017.