Voravongsa II

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Voravongsa II (or Thammikarath Vorouvongsa II) (b. 1585- d. 1622) was the king of the Laotian Kingdom of Lan Xa reigning from 1596 to 1621.

He was the son of Vorapita and Princess Dharmagayi, the youngest daughter of King Phothisarath I.

He succeeded his cousin in 1596. Reigned under the regency of his father. He was captured by rebels and proclaimed king in 1599. Reconciled with his father, who renounced the regency, was crowned with the reign name of Vara Varman Dharmika Raja Jaya in 1603.

One of his several wives was Nang Kaen (married in 1596), a former consort of his father, Brhat Varapitra Vorapita.

In 1621 he was deposed by his son, and killed on his orders. He had five sons, including Ouphagnauvarath King of Lan Xang for nine months since 1621[ citation needed ]

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Nakhon Noi briefly occupied the throne of Lan Xang from 1582–1583 on the death of his father Sen Soulintha, who himself had been appointed as a vassal to the Toungoo Empire from 1580-1582. Nakhon Noi took the regnal name Samdach Brhat Chao Samdach Brhat Chao Negara Nawi Raja Sri Sadhana Kanayudha. Little is known about his brief rule, it does not appear in the sources that the Burmese were at the origin of his selection to succeed Sen Soulintha and were instead informed belatedly. If he had supporters in the royal court of Lan Xang they were few and quickly became unhappy with his rule. Within the year the royal court had petitioned King Nanda Bayin for his removal. According to various versions of the chronicles it is cited that Nakhon Noi “did not rule with fairness,” or keep to the religious and behavioral precepts which were traditionally required by a sovereign. Other versions record that he simply had made enemies at court, or was perceived as illegitimate because he was of common origins. Either at the hands of the royal court, or the Burmese, Nakhon Noi was deposed, arrested, and returned to Pegu. After Nakhon Noi was deposed a period of interregnum occurred from 1583-1591 which historian Paul Le Boulanger describes as a period of “absolute confusion,” among the factions at court. The chronicles again agree that it was only after the period of succession crisis that a petition was finally sent in 1591 to Nanda Bayin by the Lao sangha and Lan Xang court asking for Prince No Muang, the son and legitimate heir of Setthathirath, to be appointed as king. Nanda Bayin confirmed the request and Prince No Muang would take the throne as Nokeo Koumane and reign Lan Xang from 1591-1596.

Keo Koumane, or Nu Muang Kaeva Kumara, Nokeo Koumane was born No Muong (1571–1596) was King of Lan Xang reigning from 1571 till 1572 and from 1591 till 1596. He was the son of King Sai Setthathirath I by his wife, a daughter of King Sen Soulintha.

Ouphagnauvarath I was the King of Lan Xang for nine months (1621-1622). He was born in 1597 as the son of Lan Xan King Vorouvongsa II. Later he was appointed as Heir Apparent with the title of Upyuvaraja. He deposed his father and seized the throne in 1621 reigning for nine months. He died under mysterious circumstances in 1622.

Mon Keo was the king of the Laotian Kingdom of Lan Xang between 1627 and 1633, Reigning with the regnal name of Samdach Brhat-Anya Chao Manikya Kaeva Raja Sri Sadhana Kanayudha, he was the son of King Voravongsa II and brother of King Ouphagnauvarath I.

References

    Preceded by
    Nokeo Koumane
    King of Lan Xang
    15981622
    Succeeded by
    Oupagnouvarath