Watkin baronets

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The coat of arms of the Watkin baronets on a bookplate of Sir Edward William Watkin, the first Baronet. It is emblazoned as follows: "Argent gutte de poix a leopard's face jessant-de-lis azure between three harvest flies volant proper. Crest: a cock's head couped transfixed through the mouth by a tilting spear palewise all proper." The motto is "Saie and doe" (probably "Say and do"). Bookplate of Edward William Watkin (1880-1901).jpg
The coat of arms of the Watkin baronets on a bookplate of Sir Edward William Watkin, the first Baronet. It is emblazoned as follows: "Argent gutté de poix a leopard's face jessant-de-lis azure between three harvest flies volant proper. Crest: a cock's head couped transfixed through the mouth by a tilting spear palewise all proper." The motto is "Saie and doe" (probably "Say and do").

The Watkin Baronetcy, of Northenden in the County Palatine of Chester (now Cheshire), was a title in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom. It was created on 12 May 1880 for the railway magnate and politician Sir Edward William Watkin. He was succeeded by his son, Alfred Meller Watkin, the second Baronet, who sat as Liberal Member of Parliament for Great Grimsby. The title became extinct on the second Baronet's death in 1914.

Northenden suburban area in the city of Manchester, England

Northenden is a suburb of Manchester, England, with a population of 14,771 at the 2011 census. It lies on the south side of the River Mersey, 4.2 miles (6.8 km) west of Stockport and 5.2 miles (8.4 km) south of Manchester city centre, in the Wythenshawe district of south Manchester. It is bounded by Didsbury to the north, Gatley to the east, and the rest of Wythenshawe to the south and west.

Cheshire County of England

Cheshire is a county in North West England, bordering Merseyside and Greater Manchester to the north, Derbyshire to the east, Staffordshire and Shropshire to the south and Flintshire, Wales and Wrexham county borough to the west. Cheshire's county town is the City of Chester (118,200); the largest town is Warrington (209,700). Other major towns include Crewe (71,722), Ellesmere Port (55,715), Macclesfield (52,044), Northwich (75,000), Runcorn (61,789), Widnes (61,464) and Winsford (32,610)

Edward Watkin English MP and railway entrepreneur

Sir Edward William Watkin, 1st Baronet was a British Member of Parliament and railway entrepreneur. He was an ambitious visionary, and presided over large-scale railway engineering projects to fulfil his business aspirations, eventually rising to become chairman of nine different British railway companies.

Watkin baronets, of Northenden (1880)

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References

  1. Bernard Burke (1878), The General Armory of England, Scotland, Ireland, and Wales; Comprising a Registry of Armorial Bearings from the Earliest to the Present Time, London: Harrison, p. cxxviii, OCLC   752749300 .