Wave motion gun (disambiguation)

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Wave motion gun is a fictional weapon from the Space Battleship Yamato anime series

<i>Space Battleship Yamato</i> Anime series that started in 1974

Space Battleship Yamato is a Japanese science fiction anime series produced and written by Yoshinobu Nishizaki, directed by manga artist Leiji Matsumoto, and animated by Academy Productions and Group TAC. The series aired in Yomiuri TV from October 6, 1974 to March 30, 1975, totaling up to 26 episodes. It revolves around the character Susumu Kodai and a crew of people on Earth, tasked in going into space aboard the space warship Yamato in search for the Planet Iscandar in order to reverse the damage done to their planet after it was destroyed by the Gamilians.

Wave motion gun may also refer to:

Marcy Playground American indie rock band

Marcy Playground is an American alternative rock band consisting of three members: John Wozniak, Dylan Keefe (bass), and Shlomi Lavie (drums). The band is best known for their 1997 hit "Sex and Candy".

Looter (comics) Marvel Comics supervillain also known as Meteor Man

The Looter is a fictional character, a supervillain appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics. The character appears in the Spider-Man comic books.

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Machine gun fully automatic mounted or portable firearm

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A projectile is any object thrown into space by the exertion of a force. Although any object in motion through space may be called a projectile, the term more commonly refers to a ranged weapon. Mathematical equations of motion are used to analyze projectile trajectory. An object projected at an angle to the horizontal has both the vertical and horizontal components of velocity. The vertical component of the velocity on the y-axis given as Vy=USin(teta) while the horizontal component of the velocity Vx=UCos(teta). There are various terms used in projectiles at specific angle teta 1. Time to reach maximum height. It is symbolized as (t), which is the time taken for the projectile to reach the maximum height from the plane of projection. Mathematically, it is give as t=USin(teta)/g Where g=acceleration due to gravity(app 10m/s²) U= initial velocity (m/s) teta= angle made by the projectile with the horizontal axis.

BFG (weapon) weapon in Doom

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When discussing weapons in science fiction, a plasma weapon is a type of raygun that fires a stream, bolt(s), pulse or toroid of plasma. The primary damage mechanism of these fictional weapons is usually thermal transfer; it typically causes serious burns, and often immediate death of living creatures, and melts or evaporates other materials. In certain fiction, plasma weapons may also have a significant kinetic energy component, that is to say the ionized material is projected with sufficient momentum to cause some secondary impact damage in addition to causing high thermal damage. In some fictions, like Star Wars, plasma is highly effective against mechanical targets such as droids. The ionized gas disrupts their systems.

Gun fu, a portmanteau of gun and kung fu, is a fictional style of sophisticated close-quarters Gunfight resembling a martial arts battle played out with firearms instead of traditional weapons. It can be seen in Hong Kong action cinema and in American films influenced by it.

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Bipod attachment, usually to a weapon, that helps support and steady it

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Blaster (<i>Star Wars</i>) fictional type of personal laser weapon from Star Wars

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Nock gun

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WMG may refer to:

Space Battleship Yamato was the title spaceship from the anime series Space Battleship Yamato, designed by Leiji Matsumoto in the 1970s. According to the fictional continuity of the anime series, the spacecraft was built inside the remains of the Japanese battleship Yamato. In the American dub of the series Star Blazers, the spaceship has the same origin, but was renamed the Argo. In Spanish-speaking countries, its name was changed to Intrépido ("Intrepid").

JDS <i>Mirai</i> fictional ship

The JDS Mirai (DDH-182), is a fictional helicopter defense destroyer of the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF), created for the Japanese manga and anime series Zipang. The central point of the plot of the anime is that the modern warship Mirai is transported back sixty years through time to 1942 on the eve of the Battle of Midway. The ship's weapons alone are enough to change the course of World War II, but equally potent are the advanced technology and knowledge of future events on board. The name of the ship is a homophone for the Japanese word meaning "future" and is often the basis of double entendres in the anime.

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The following is a list of action figures in the Transformers: Prime computer-animated robot superhero TV Series.

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The Internet Movie Firearms Database (IMFDb) is an online database of firearms used or featured in films, television shows, video games, and anime. A wiki running the MediaWiki software, it is similar in function to the Internet Movie Database for the entertainment industry. It includes articles relating to actors, and some characters, such as James Bond, listing the particular firearms they have been associated with in their movies. Integrated into the website is an image hosting section similar to Wikimedia Commons that includes firearm photos, manufacturer logos, screenshots and related art. The site has been cited in magazines such as the NRA's American Rifleman and True West Magazine and magazine format television shows such as Shooting USA on the Outdoor Channel.