Waveguide rotary joint

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A waveguide rotary joint is used in microwave communications to connect two different types of RF waveguides. Because coaxial parts are symmetrical in ø direction, free rotation without performance degradation is accomplished. In the rotating part, electrical continuity is achieved by λ/4-chokes eliminating metal contacts. The Rotary Joints can have both waveguide ports at a right angle to the rotational axis, "U-style", one waveguide port at a right angle and one in line, "L-style" or both waveguide ports in line. "I-style". Waveguide Rotary Joint modules are available for all frequency bands. [1]

Microwave form of electromagnetic radiation

Microwaves are a form of electromagnetic radiation with wavelengths ranging from about one meter to one millimeter; with frequencies between 300 MHz (1 m) and 300 GHz (1 mm). Different sources define different frequency ranges as microwaves; the above broad definition includes both UHF and EHF bands. A more common definition in radio engineering is the range between 1 and 100 GHz. In all cases, microwaves include the entire SHF band at minimum. Frequencies in the microwave range are often referred to by their IEEE radar band designations: S, C, X, Ku, K, or Ka band, or by similar NATO or EU designations.

Radio frequency (RF) is the oscillation rate of an alternating electric current or voltage or of a magnetic, electric or electromagnetic field or mechanical system in the frequency range from around 20 kHz to around 300 GHz. This is roughly between the upper limit of audio frequencies and the lower limit of infrared frequencies; these are the frequencies at which energy from an oscillating current can radiate off a conductor into space as radio waves. Different sources specify different upper and lower bounds for the frequency range.

Coaxial

In geometry, coaxial means that two or more three-dimensional linear forms share a common axis. Thus, it is concentric in three-dimensional, linear forms.

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Universal joint mechanism with bendable rotation axis

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Rotary union

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