Wine gallon

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A wine gallon is a unit of capacity that was used routinely in England as far back as the 14th century, and by statute under Queen Anne since 1707. [1] [2] Britain abandoned the wine gallon in 1826 when it adopted imperial units for measurement. The 1707 wine gallon is the basis of the United States' gallon, as well as other measures. [3]

The Imperial gallon was defined with yet another set of temperature and pressure values (62 °F (17 °C) and 30.0 inHg (102 kPa))

To convert a wine gallon to an Imperial gallon, multiply by 0.833111. To convert an Imperial gallon to a wine gallon, multiply by 1.200320.

Some research concludes that the wine gallon was originally meant to hold 8 troy pounds of wine. [3] The 1707 British statute defines the wine gallon as 231 cubic inches (3,790 cm3) – e.g. a cylinder 7 inches (178 mm) in diameter and 6 inches (152 mm) high, [4] c. 3.785 litre – and was used to measure the volume of wine and other commercial liquids such as cooking oils and honey. [5] A 14th-century barrel of wine contained 31.5 US gal (119 l; 26.2 imp gal), which equals one-eighth of the tun of 252 gallons.

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Capacities of wine casks were formerly measured and standardised according to a specific system of English units. The various units were historically defined in terms of the wine gallon so varied according to the definition of the gallon until the adoption of the Queen Anne wine gallon in 1707. In the United Kingdom and its colonies the units were redefined with the introduction of the imperial system whilst the Queen Anne wine gallon was adopted as the standard US liquid gallon.

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Imperial and US customary measurement systems

The imperial and US customary measurement systems are both derived from an earlier English system of measurement which in turn can be traced back to Ancient Roman units of measurement, and Carolingian and Saxon units of measure.

The quarter is used as the name of several distinct English units based on ¼ sizes of some base unit.

A number of units of measurement were used in South Africa to measure quantities like length, mass, capacity, etc. The Imperial system of measurements was made standard in 1922 and the metric system was adopted in 1970.

The Exchequer Standards may refer to the set of official English standards for weights and measures created by Queen Elizabeth I, and in effect from 1588 to 1826, when the Imperial Units system took effect, or to the whole range of English unit standards maintained by the Court of the Exchequer from the 1200s, or to the physical reference standards physically kept at the Exchequer and used as the legal reference until the such responsibility was transferred in the 1860s, after the Imperial system had been established.

References

  1. "Wine Gallon". Sizes.com. Retrieved 6 September 2016.
  2. "The Carysfort Committee & the Wine Gallon, 1758" (PDF). Retrieved 6 September 2016.
  3. 1 2 Rowlett, Russ (September 13, 2001). "Gallon". How Many? A Dictionary of Units of Measurement. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill . Retrieved 2020-01-16.
  4. π was often approximated 3 17 at the time.
  5. "wine barrel". Sizes.com. 2009-02-02. Retrieved 2010-07-29.