Women's fiction

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Women's fiction edition of Ms. magazine in 2002 Ms. magazine Cover - Summer 2002.jpg
Women's fiction edition of Ms. magazine in 2002

Women's fiction is an umbrella term for women centered books that focus on women's life experience that are marketed to female readers, and includes many mainstream novels or women's rights Books. It is distinct from Women's writing, which refers to literature written by (rather than promoted to) women. There exists no comparable label in English for works of fiction that are marketed to men.

Contents

The Romance Writers of America organization defines women's fiction as, "a commercial novel about a woman on the brink of life change and personal growth. Her journey details emotional reflection and action that transforms her and her relationships with others, and includes a hopeful/upbeat ending with regard to her romantic relationship." [1]

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References

  1. What is RWA-WF?, Romance Writers of America, 2011, p. 4, archived from the original on 2013-01-25, retrieved 2013-02-11.