World Contact Day

Last updated
World Contact Day
Worldcontactday.jpg
Observed byInternational
TypeCultural
SignificanceA day attempting to make ET contact
CelebrationsMass Meditation
Date March 15
Next time15 March 2019 (2019-03-15)
Frequencyannual
Related to Ufology

World Contact Day was first declared in March 1953 by an organization called the International Flying Saucer Bureau (IFSB), as a day on which all IFSB members would attempt to send a telepathic message into space.

The IFSB voted to hold such a day in 1953, theorising that if both telepathy and alien life were real, a large number of people focussing on an identical piece of text may be able to transmit the message through space. [1] IFSB members focused on the following message during 1953:

Telepathy

Telepathy is the purported vicarious transmission of information from one person to another without using any known human sensory channels or physical interaction. The term was coined in 1882 by the classical scholar Frederic W. H. Myers, a founder of the Society for Psychical Research, and has remained more popular than the earlier expression thought-transference.

Calling occupants of interplanetary craft! Calling occupants of interplanetary craft that have been observing our planet EARTH. We of IFSB wish to make contact with you. We are your friends, and would like you to make an appearance here on EARTH. Your presence before us will be welcomed with the utmost friendship. We will do all in our power to promote mutual understanding between your people and the people of EARTH. Please come in peace and help us in our EARTHLY problems. Give us some sign that you have received our message. Be responsible for creating a miracle here on our planet to wake up the ignorant ones to reality. Let us hear from you. We are your friends. [2]

The 1953 celebration is referenced in the song "Calling Occupants of Interplanetary Craft", recorded in 1976 by Klaatu and later covered by The Carpenters. [3]

Calling Occupants of Interplanetary Craft 1976 single by Klaatu

"Calling Occupants of Interplanetary Craft" is a song by Klaatu, originally released in 1976 on their first album 3:47 EST. The song would open night transmission of the pirate radio station Radio Caroline. The year following its release, the Carpenters covered the song, using a crew of 160 musicians. The Carpenters' version reached the top 10 in the UK and Canada, and charted at number 1 in Ireland.

Klaatu (band) Canadian progressive rock band

Klaatu was a Canadian rock group formed in 1973 by the duo of John Woloschuk and Dee Long. They named themselves after the extraterrestrial character Klaatu in the film The Day the Earth Stood Still. After recording two non-charting singles, drummer Terry Draper was added to the line-up; this trio would constitute Klaatu throughout the rest of the band's recording career.

The Carpenters American vocal duo

The Carpenters were an American vocal and instrumental duo consisting of siblings Karen (1950–1983) and Richard Carpenter (b. 1946). They produced a distinct soft musical style, combining Karen's contralto vocals with Richard's arranging and composition skills. During their 14-year career, the Carpenters recorded ten albums, along with numerous singles and several television specials.

On the event's 60th anniversary in 2013, World Contact Day was extended to a whole week. [4]

See also

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Albert K. Bender UFO researcher

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References

  1. David, Jay (1967). The Flying Saucer Reader. p. 89.
  2. Bender, Albert K. (1968). Flying Saucers and the Three Men.
  3. Woloschuk, John. "Klaatu Track Facts" (quote used by permission). The Official Klaatu Homepage. Retrieved 2007-04-18.
  4. https://web.archive.org/web/20131227171506/http://worldcontactday.com/