1953 South American Championship

Last updated
1953 South American Championship
Tournament details
Host countryPeru
DatesFebruary 22 – April 1
Teams7 (from 1 confederation)
Venue(s)1 (in 1 host city)
Final positions
ChampionsFlag of Paraguay.svg  Paraguay (1st title)
Runners-upFlag of Brazil (1889-1960).svg  Brazil
Third placeFlag of Uruguay.svg  Uruguay
Fourth placeFlag of Chile.svg  Chile
Tournament statistics
Matches played22
Goals scored67 (3.05 per match)
Top scorer(s) Flag of Chile.svg Francisco Molina
(7 goals)
1949
1955

The South American Championship 1953 was a football tournament held in Peru and won by Paraguay with Brazil second.

Peru republic in South America

Peru, officially the Republic of Peru, is a country in western South America. It is bordered in the north by Ecuador and Colombia, in the east by Brazil, in the southeast by Bolivia, in the south by Chile, and in the west by the Pacific Ocean. Peru is a megadiverse country with habitats ranging from the arid plains of the Pacific coastal region in the west to the peaks of the Andes mountains vertically extending from the north to the southeast of the country to the tropical Amazon Basin rainforest in the east with the Amazon river.

Paraguay republic in South America

Paraguay, officially the Republic of Paraguay, is a country of South America. It is bordered by Argentina to the south and southwest, Brazil to the east and northeast, and Bolivia to the northwest. Although it is one of the only two landlocked countries in South America, the country has coasts, beaches and ports on the Paraguay and Paraná rivers that give exit to the Atlantic Ocean through the Paraná-Paraguay Waterway. Due to its central location in South America, it is sometimes referred to as Corazón de Sudamérica.

Brazil Federal republic in South America

Brazil, officially the Federative Republic of Brazil, is the largest country in both South America and Latin America. At 8.5 million square kilometers and with over 208 million people, Brazil is the world's fifth-largest country by area and the fifth most populous. Its capital is Brasília, and its most populated city is São Paulo. The federation is composed of the union of the 26 states, the Federal District, and the 5,570 municipalities. It is the largest country to have Portuguese as an official language and the only one in the Americas; it is also one of the most multicultural and ethnically diverse nations, due to over a century of mass immigration from around the world.

Contents

Argentina, and Colombia withdrew from the tournament.

Argentina national football team Mens national association football team representing Argentina

The Argentina national football team represents Argentina in football. Argentina's home stadium is Estadio Monumental Antonio Vespucio Liberti in Buenos Aires.

Colombia national football team mens national football team representing Colombia

The Colombia national football team represents Colombia in international football competitions and is overseen by the Colombian Football Federation. It is a member of the CONMEBOL and is currently ranked 12th in the FIFA World Rankings. The team are nicknamed Los Cafeteros due to the coffee production in their country.

Francisco Molina from Chile became top scorer of the tournament with 8 goals.

Francisco "Paco" Molina Simón was a Spanish–Chilean footballer and manager.

Chile republic in South America

Chile, officially the Republic of Chile, is a South American country occupying a long, narrow strip of land between the Andes to the east and the Pacific Ocean to the west. It borders Peru to the north, Bolivia to the northeast, Argentina to the east, and the Drake Passage in the far south. Chilean territory includes the Pacific islands of Juan Fernández, Salas y Gómez, Desventuradas, and Easter Island in Oceania. Chile also claims about 1,250,000 square kilometres (480,000 sq mi) of Antarctica, although all claims are suspended under the Antarctic Treaty.

Venues

Lima
Estadio Nacional de Lima
Capacity: 50,000
Copa America-2004-02.jpg

Final round

TeamPldWDLGFGAGDPts
Flag of Brazil (1889-1960).svg  Brazil 6402156+98
Flag of Paraguay.svg  Paraguay 6321116+58
Flag of Uruguay.svg  Uruguay 6312156+97
Flag of Chile.svg  Chile 6312101007
Flag of Peru (state).svg  Peru 631246−27
Flag of Bolivia (state).svg  Bolivia 6114615−93
Flag of Ecuador.svg  Ecuador 6024113−122
Bolivia  Flag of Bolivia (state).svg1–0Flag of Peru (state).svg  Peru
Ugarte Soccerball shade.svg 53'
Estadio Nacional, Lima
Attendance: 50,000
Referee: George Rhoden (England)

Paraguay  Flag of Paraguay.svg3–0Flag of Chile.svg  Chile
Fernández Soccerball shade.svg 54', 75'
Berni Soccerball shade.svg 78'
Estadio Nacional, Lima
Attendance: 45,000
Referee: Richard Maddison (England)

Uruguay  Flag of Uruguay.svg2–0Flag of Bolivia (state).svg  Bolivia
Puente Soccerball shade.svg 11'
Carlos Romero Soccerball shade.svg 88'
Estadio Nacional, Lima
Attendance: 45,000
Referee: Charles Dean (England)

Peru  Flag of Peru (state).svg1–0Flag of Ecuador.svg  Ecuador
Gómez Sánchez Soccerball shade.svg 78'
Estadio Nacional, Lima
Attendance: 50,000
Referee: George Rhoden (England)

Brazil  Flag of Brazil (1889-1960).svg8–1Flag of Bolivia (state).svg  Bolivia
Julinho Soccerball shade.svg 18', 20', 42', 52'
Francisco Rodrigues Soccerball shade.svg 25', 44'
Pinga Soccerball shade.svg 39', 60'
Ugarte Soccerball shade.svg 73' (pen.)
Estadio Nacional, Lima
Attendance: 45,000
Referee: Richard Maddison (England)

Chile  Flag of Chile.svg3–2Flag of Uruguay.svg  Uruguay
Molina Soccerball shade.svg 5', 55', 67' Morel Soccerball shade.svg 70'
Balseiro Soccerball shade.svg 81'
Estadio Nacional, Lima
Attendance: 45,000
Referee: Charles Dean (England)

Paraguay  Flag of Paraguay.svg0–0Flag of Ecuador.svg  Ecuador
Estadio Nacional, Lima
Attendance: 45,000
Referee: Mário Silveira Vianna (Brazil)

Chile  Flag of Chile.svg0–0Flag of Peru (state).svg  Peru
Estadio Nacional, Lima
Attendance: 45,000
Referee: Richard Maddison (England)

Bolivia  Flag of Bolivia (state).svg1–1Flag of Ecuador.svg  Ecuador
Alcón Soccerball shade.svg 25' Guzmán Soccerball shade.svg 6'
Estadio Nacional, Lima
Attendance: 45,000
Referee: Charles McKenna (England)

Peru  Flag of Peru (state).svg2–2Flag of Paraguay.svg  Paraguay
Gómez Sánchez Soccerball shade.svg 47'
Terry Soccerball shade.svg 53'
Fernández Soccerball shade.svg 36'
Berni Soccerball shade.svg 77'
Estadio Nacional, Lima
Attendance: 45,000
Referee: Richard Maddison (England)
Match was awarded to Peru due to unsportsmanlike behaviour of Paraguay by making one extra change.
Milner Ayala was banned for three years for kicking the referee.

Paraguay  Flag of Paraguay.svg2–2Flag of Uruguay.svg  Uruguay
Atilio López Soccerball shade.svg 5'
Berni Soccerball shade.svg 52'
Balseiro Soccerball shade.svg 36', 55'
Estadio Nacional, Lima
Attendance: 35,000
Referee: David Gregory (England)

Brazil  Flag of Brazil (1889-1960).svg2–0Flag of Ecuador.svg  Ecuador
Ademir Soccerball shade.svg 18'
Cláudio Soccerball shade.svg 55'
Estadio Nacional, Lima
Attendance: 35,000
Referee: Richard Maddison (England)

Brazil  Flag of Brazil (1889-1960).svg1–0Flag of Uruguay.svg  Uruguay
Ipojucan Soccerball shade.svg 87'
Estadio Nacional, Lima
Attendance: 45,000
Referee: Charles McKenna (England)

Paraguay  Flag of Paraguay.svg2–1Flag of Bolivia (state).svg  Bolivia
Angel Romero Soccerball shade.svg 17'
Berni Soccerball shade.svg 22'
Ramon Santos Soccerball shade.svg 76'
Estadio Nacional, Lima
Attendance: 15,000
Referee: David Gregory (England)

Chile  Flag of Chile.svg3–0Flag of Ecuador.svg  Ecuador
Molina Soccerball shade.svg 33', 47'
Cremaschi Soccerball shade.svg 70'
Estadio Nacional, Lima
Attendance: 55,000
Referee: Richard Maddison (England)

Peru  Flag of Peru (state).svg1–0Flag of Brazil (1889-1960).svg  Brazil
Navarrete Soccerball shade.svg 51'
Estadio Nacional, Lima
Attendance: 55,000
Referee: Charles McKenna (England)

Brazil  Flag of Brazil (1889-1960).svg3–2Flag of Chile.svg  Chile
Julinho Soccerball shade.svg 1'
Zizinho Soccerball shade.svg 53'
Baltazar Soccerball shade.svg 70'
Molina Soccerball shade.svg 62', 76'
Estadio Nacional, Lima
Attendance: 35,000
Referee: Richard Maddison (England)

Uruguay  Flag of Uruguay.svg6–0Flag of Ecuador.svg  Ecuador
Méndez Soccerball shade.svg 12'
Puente Soccerball shade.svg 51'
Peláez Soccerball shade.svg 58'
Morel Soccerball shade.svg 60'
Carlos Romero Soccerball shade.svg 86'
Balseiro Soccerball shade.svg 88'
Estadio Nacional, Lima
Attendance: 35,000
Referee: David Gregory (England)

Paraguay  Flag of Paraguay.svg2–1Flag of Brazil (1889-1960).svg  Brazil
Atilio López Soccerball shade.svg 49'
León Soccerball shade.svg 89'
Nílton Santos Soccerball shade.svg 12'
Estadio Nacional, Lima
Attendance: 35,000
Referee: Charles Dean (England)

Chile  Flag of Chile.svg2–2Flag of Bolivia (state).svg  Bolivia
Meléndez Soccerball shade.svg 28'
Díaz Carmona Soccerball shade.svg 52'
Ramón Santos Soccerball shade.svg 15'
Alcón Soccerball shade.svg 49'
Estadio Nacional, Lima
Attendance: 45,000
Referee: Richard Maddison (England)
Match was suspended after 66th min, and awarded to Chile due to unsportsmanlike behaviour of Bolivia.

Uruguay  Flag of Uruguay.svg3–0Flag of Peru (state).svg  Peru
Peláez Soccerball shade.svg 23', 67'
Carlos Romero Soccerball shade.svg 71'
Estadio Nacional, Lima
Attendance: 45,000
Referee: Mário Silveira Vianna (Brazil)

Final

Paraguay  Flag of Paraguay.svg3–2Flag of Brazil (1889-1960).svg  Brazil
Atilio López Soccerball shade.svg 14'
Gavilán Soccerball shade.svg 17'
Fernández Soccerball shade.svg 41'
Baltazar Soccerball shade.svg 56', 65'
Estadio Nacional, Lima
Attendance: 35,000
Referee: Charles Dean (England)

Result

 1953 South American Championship Champions 
Flag of Paraguay.svg
Paraguay
1st title

Goal scorers

7 Goals

5 Goals

4 Goals

3 Goals

2 Goals

1 Goal

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References

  1. Oliver, Guy (1992). The Guinness Record of World Soccer. Guinness publishing. p. 561. ISBN   0-85112-954-4.