1984 European Competition for Women's Football

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1984 European Competition for Women's Football
Tournament details
Dates 8 April – 27 May
Teams 4
Venue(s) 6 (in 6 host cities)
Final positions
ChampionsFlag of Sweden.svg  Sweden (1st title)
Runners-upFlag of England.svg  England
Tournament statistics
Matches played 6
Goals scored 14 (2.33 per match)
Attendance 20,830 (3,472 per match)
Top scorer(s) Flag of Sweden.svg Pia Sundhage (4 goals)
Best player Flag of Sweden.svg Pia Sundhage
1979
1987

The 1984 European Competition for Women's Football was won by Sweden on penalties against England. [1] [2] It comprised four qualifying groups, the winner of each going through to the semi-finals which were played over two legs, home and away. As only sixteen teams took part (less than half the membership of UEFA at the time), the competition could not be granted official status. [3] Matches comprised two halves of 35 minutes, played with a size four football. [4]

UEFA Womens Championship European association football tournament for womens national teams

The UEFA European Women's Championship, also called the UEFA Women's Euro and unofficially the "European Cup", held every fourth year, is the main competition in women's association football between national teams of the UEFA Confederation. The competition is the women's equivalent of the UEFA European Championship.

Sweden women's national football team won the European Competition for Women's Football in 1984, one World Cup-silver (2003), as well as three European Championship-silvers. The team has participated in six Olympic Games, seven World Cups, as well as nine European Championships. Sweden won the bronze medal at the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup.

The England women's national football team has been governed by the Football Association (FA) since 1993, having been previously administered by the Women's Football Association (WFA). England played its first international match in November 1972 against Scotland. Although most national football teams represent a sovereign state, as a member of the United Kingdom's Home Nations, England is permitted by FIFA statutes to maintain its own national side that competes in all major tournaments, with the exception of the Women's Olympic Football Tournament.

Contents

Qualification

Squads

For a list of all squads that played in the final tournament, see 1984 European Competition for Women's Football squads

This article lists all the confirmed national football squads for the 1984 European Competition for Women's Football.

Semifinals

First leg

England  Flag of England.svg21Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark
Curl Soccerball shade.svg 31'
Deighan Soccerball shade.svg 51'
DBU Report (in Danish) Hindkjær Soccerball shade.svg 49' (pen.)
Gresty Road, Crewe
Attendance: 1,000
Referee: Kevin O'Sullivan (Republic of Ireland)
Italy  Flag of Italy.svg23Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden
Morace Soccerball shade.svg 18'
Vignotto Soccerball shade.svg 31'
SvFF Report (in Swedish)
FIGC Report (in Italian)
Björk Soccerball shade.svg 23'
Sundhage Soccerball shade.svg 48'
Uusitalo Soccerball shade.svg 57'
Stadio Flaminio, Rome
Attendance: 5,000
Referee: Werner Föckler (West Germany)
*Match info [2]

Second leg

Denmark  Flag of Denmark.svg01Flag of England.svg  England
DBU Report (in Danish) Bampton Soccerball shade.svg 44'
Hjørring Stadium, Hjørring
Attendance: 1,439
Referee: Kaj Natri (Finland)

England won 31 on aggregate.

Sweden  Flag of Sweden.svg21Flag of Italy.svg  Italy
Sundhage Soccerball shade.svg 28', 52' SvFF Report (in Swedish)
FIGC Report (in Italian)
Morace Soccerball shade.svg 50'
Folkungavallen, Linköping
Attendance: 5,162
Referee: Rolf Haugen (Norway)
*Match info [2]

Sweden won 53 on aggregate.

Final

First leg

Sweden  Flag of Sweden.svg10Flag of England.svg  England
Sundhage Soccerball shade.svg 57' SvFF Report (in Swedish)
Ullevi, Gothenburg
Attendance: 5,662
Referee: Cees Bakker (Netherlands)
*Match info [2]

Second leg

England  Flag of England.svg10Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden
Curl Soccerball shade.svg 31' SvFF Report (in Swedish)
Penalties
Curl Soccerball shade cross.svg
Gallimore Soccerball shad check.svg
Bampton Soccerball shad check.svg
Hanson Soccerball shade cross.svg
Davis Soccerball shad check.svg
3 – 4 [2] Soccerball shad check.svg Börjesson
Soccerball shad check.svg Andersson
Soccerball shade cross.svg Björk
Soccerball shad check.svg Jansson
Soccerball shad check.svg Sundhage
Kenilworth Road, Luton
Attendance: 2,567
Referee: Ignace Goris (Belgium)

Sweden won 4-3 on penalties (no extra time played)

Awards

 1984 European Competition for Women's Football Winners 
Flag of Sweden.svg
Sweden

Goalscorers

4 goals
2 goals
1 goal

Source: UEFA [5]

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References

  1. Tony Leighton (19 May 2009). "Seven deadly sins of football: England's shoot-out jinx begins - England, 1984 | Football". London: The Guardian. Retrieved 2012-09-24.
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 "EM för damer 1984". SvFF (in Swedish). 27 August 2009. Retrieved 24 January 2018.
  3. "1984: Sweden take first title –". Uefa.com. Retrieved 2012-08-23.
  4. "2013 Uefa Women's Competitions" (PDF). UEFA. August 2013. p. 4. Retrieved 12 January 2014.
  5. "1982-84 Overview". UEFA . Retrieved 24 January 2018.