1989 European Competition for Women's Football

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1989 European Competition for Women's Football
Fußball-Europameisterschaft der Frauen 1989
Tournament details
Host countryWest Germany
Dates28 June – 2 July
Teams4
Venue(s)3 (in 3 host cities)
Final positions
ChampionsFlag of Germany.svg  West Germany (1st title)
Runners-upFlag of Norway.svg  Norway
Third placeFlag of Sweden.svg  Sweden
Tournament statistics
Matches played4
Goals scored13 (3.25 per match)
Top scorer(s) Flag of Norway.svg Sissel Grude
Flag of Germany.svg Ursula Lohn
(2 goals each)
Best player(s) Flag of Germany.svg Doris Fitschen
1987
1991

The 1989 European Competition for Women's Football took place in West Germany. It was won by the hosts in a final against defending champions Norway. Again, the competition began with four qualifying groups, but this time the top two countries qualified for a home-and-away quarter final, before the four winners entered the semi-finals in the host nation. [1]

West Germany Federal Republic of Germany in the years 1949–1990

West Germany, officially the Federal Republic of Germany, and referred to by historians as the Bonn Republic, was a country in Central Europe that existed from 1949 to 1990, when the western portion of Germany was part of the Western bloc during the Cold War. It was created during the Allied occupation of Germany in 1949 after World War II, established from eleven states formed in the three Allied zones of occupation held by the United States, the United Kingdom and France. Its capital was the city of Bonn.

Germany womens national football team womens national association football team representing Germany

The Germany women's national football team is governed by the German Football Association (DFB).

Norway womens national football team womens national association football team representing Norway

The Norway women's national football team is controlled by the Football Association of Norway. The team is former European, World and Olympic champions and thus one of the most successful national teams. The team has had less success since the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup.

Contents

Qualification

Squads

For a list of all squads that played in the final tournament, see 1989 European Competition for Women's Football squads

This article lists all the confirmed national football squads for the 1989 European Competition for Women's Football.

Semifinals

West Germany  Flag of Germany.svg11 (a.e.t.)Flag of Italy.svg  Italy
Neid Soccerball shade.svg 57' Report
DFB Report (in German)
FIGC Report (in Italian)
Vignotto Soccerball shade.svg 72'
Penalties
Kuhlmann Soccerball shad check.svg
Bindl Soccerball shad check.svg
Fitschen Soccerball shad check.svg
Fehrmann Soccerball shade cross.svg
Landers Soccerball shade cross.svg
Voss Soccerball shade cross.svg
Isbert Soccerball shad check.svg
43Soccerball shad check.svg Ferraguzzi
Soccerball shade cross.svg Carta
Soccerball shad check.svg Morace
Soccerball shade cross.svg Vignotto
Soccerball shad check.svg D'Astolfo
Soccerball shade cross.svg Iozzelli
Soccerball shade cross.svg Marsiletti
Leimbachstadion, Siegen
Attendance: 8,000
Referee: Brian Hill (England)


Sweden  Flag of Sweden.svg12Flag of Norway.svg  Norway
Videkull Soccerball shade.svg 54' Report
NFF Report (in Norwegian)
SvFF Report (in Swedish)
Medalen Soccerball shade.svg 1'
Grude Soccerball shade.svg 52'
Nattenberg Stadion, Lüdenscheid
Attendance: 3,000
Referee: Cornelius Bakker (Netherlands)

Third place playoff

Sweden  Flag of Sweden.svg21 (a.e.t.)Flag of Italy.svg  Italy
Sundhage Soccerball shade.svg 43'
H. Johansson Soccerball shade.svg 94'
Report
FIGC Report (in Italian)
SvFF Report (in Swedish)
Ferraguzzi Soccerball shade.svg 28'
Stadion an der Bremer Brücke, Osnabrück
Attendance: 2,500
Referee: Ivan Gregr (Czechoslovakia)

Final

West Germany  Flag of Germany.svg41Flag of Norway.svg  Norway
Lohn Soccerball shade.svg 22', 36'
Mohr Soccerball shade.svg 45'
Fehrmann Soccerball shade.svg 73'
Report
DFB Report (in German)
NFF Report (in Norwegian)
Grude Soccerball shade.svg 54'

Awards

 1989 European Competition for Women's Football Winners 
Flag of Germany.svg
West Germany
First title

Goalscorers

2 goals
1 goal

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References

  1. "1989: Germany arrive in style –". Uefa.com. Retrieved 23 August 2012.