2011 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification

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Qualification for the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup determines which 15 teams join Germany, the hosts of the 2011 tournament, to play for the Women's World Cup. Europe has 5.5 qualifying berths (including the hosts), Asia 3 berths, North and Central America 2.5 berths, Africa 2 berths, South America 2 berths and Oceania 1 berth. The 16th spot was determined through a play-off match between the third-placed team in North/Central America and the winner of repechage play-offs in Europe. [1]

2011 FIFA Womens World Cup 2011 edition of the FIFA Womens World Cup

The 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup was the sixth FIFA Women's World Cup competition, the world championship for women's national association football teams. It was held from 26 June to 17 July 2011 in Germany, which won the right to host the event in October 2007. Japan won the final against the United States on a penalty shoot-out following a 2–2 draw after extra time and became the first Asian team to win a senior FIFA World Cup.

Germany womens national football team womens national association football team representing Germany

The Germany women's national football team is governed by the German Football Association (DFB).

FIFA Womens World Cup international association football competition

The FIFA Women's World Cup is an international football competition contested by the senior women's national teams of the members of Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), the sport's international governing body. The competition has been held every four years since 1991, when the inaugural tournament, then called the FIFA Women's World Championship, was held in China.

Contents

Qualified teams

Country qualified for World Cup
Country failed to qualify
Country did not enter qualification
Country not a FIFA member 2011 womens world cup qualification.png
  Country qualified for World Cup
  Country failed to qualify
  Country did not enter qualification
  Country not a FIFA member
TeamQualified asQualification dateAppearance
in finals
Consecutive
streak
Previous best performance FIFA
Ranking
1
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany Host nation30 October 20076th6Champions (2003, 2007)2
Flag of Australia.svg  Australia 2010 AFC Women's Asian Cup winner27 May 20105th5Quarter-finals (2007)11
Flag of North Korea.svg  North Korea 2010 AFC Women's Asian Cup runner-up27 May 20104th4Quarter-finals (2007)8
Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 2010 AFC Women's Asian Cup third place30 May 20106th6Quarter-finals (1995)4
Flag of France.svg  France UEFA qualifying competition play-off winner15 September 20102nd1First Round (2003)7
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway UEFA qualifying competition play-off winner15 September 20106th6Champions (1995)9
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden UEFA qualifying competition play-off winner16 September 20106th6Runner-Up (2003)5
Flag of England.svg  England UEFA qualifying competition play-off winner16 September 20103rd2Quarter-finals (1995, 2007)10
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 2010 OFC Women's Championship winner8 October 20103rd2First round (1991, 2007)24
Flag of Canada.svg  Canada 2010 CONCACAF Women's Gold Cup winner5 November 20105th5Fourth place (2003)6
Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico 2010 CONCACAF Women's Gold Cup runner-up5 November 20102nd1First round (1999)22
Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 2010 African Women's Football Championship winner11 November 20106th6Quarter-finals (1999)27
Flag of Equatorial Guinea.svg  Equatorial Guinea 2010 African Women's Football Championship runner-up11 November 20101st1First appearance 61
Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 2010 Sudamericano Femenino winner19 November 20106th6Runner-Up (2007) 3
Flag of Colombia.svg  Colombia 2010 Sudamericano Femenino runner-up21 November 20101st1First appearance 31
Flag of the United States.svg  United States UEFA-CONCACAF play-off winner27 November 20106th6Champions (1991, 1999)1
1. ^ The rankings are shown as of 18 March 2011, the latest published. [2]

Africa

(24 teams competing for 2 berths)

As in the previous World Cup cycle the African Women's Championship will serve as the qualification tournament for the Women's World Cup. The tournament was scheduled to be held from 31 October to 14 November 2010 in South Africa. [3] The two finalists will advance to the Women's World Cup finals in Germany.

Eight teams will compete in the continental finals in South Africa, with qualification consisting of two rounds of knock-out home and away ties. The preliminary round was held in March 2010, with winners advancing to the first round of qualification, which was held in May and June 2010.

The seven winners from this round, along with hosts South Africa, advanced to the continental finals. These finals will consist of two round-robin groups of four teams. The top two finishers in each group will advance to the two semi-finals, with each semi-final winner qualifying for the World Cup finals.

Final tournament

Knockout stage

 
Semi finalsFinal
 
      
 
11 November
 
 
Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 5
 
14 November
 
Flag of Cameroon.svg  Cameroon 1
 
Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 4
 
11 November
 
Flag of Equatorial Guinea.svg  Equatorial Guinea 2
 
Flag of Equatorial Guinea.svg  Equatorial Guinea 3 (aet)
 
 
Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa 1
 
Third place play-off
 
 
14 November
 
 
Flag of Cameroon.svg  Cameroon 0
 
 
Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa 2

Asia

(17 teams competing for 3 berths)

As in the previous World Cup cycle, the 2010 AFC Women's Asian Cup served as a qualifying tournament.

The 2010 AFC Women's Asian Cup was held from 19–30 May at the Chengdu Sports Center in China PR. The winners, Australia, runners-up, Korea DPR, and third-place team, Japan qualified for the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup.

The five leading AFC nations, North Korea (the defending AFC women's champions), South Korea, Japan, China and Australia were automatic qualifiers for the finals (held from 19–30 May 2010). They were joined by the winners of each of three qualification groups held in July 2009. A preliminary round of qualification held in April and May 2009 began the qualifiers for the 2011 finals.

North Korea womens national football team womens national football team representing North Korea

The North Korea women's national football team represents North Korea in international women's football. North Korea won the AFC Women's Asian Cup in 2001, 2003, and 2008.

South Korea womens national football team womens national association football team representing South Korea

The South Korea women's national football team represents South Korea in international women's football competitions. The team is referred to as the Korea Republic by FIFA. Its first game was a match against Japan in 1990, which it lost 13–1. Since then, it has qualified for two FIFA World Cups, in 2003 and 2015.

Japan womens national football team womens national association football team representing Japan

The Japan women's national football team, or Nadeshiko Japan (なでしこジャパン), represents Japan in association football and is run by the Japan Football Association (JFA). It is the most successful women's national team from the Asian Football Confederation. Its highest ranking in the FIFA Women's World Rankings is 3rd.

The final tournament was held in Chengdu, China. [4] The two finalists – Australia and North Korea – and the winner of the third place play-off – Japan – qualified for the Women's World Cup finals. For the first time in the history of FIFA Women's World Cup, China failed to qualify for the finals.

Chengdu Prefecture-level & Sub-provincial city in Sichuan, Peoples Republic of China

Chengdu, formerly romanized as Chengtu, is a sub-provincial city which serves as the capital of Sichuan province, People's Republic of China. It is one of the three most populous cities in Western China, the other two being Chongqing and Xi'an. As of 2014, the administrative area housed 14,427,500 inhabitants, with an urban population of 10,152,632. At the time of the 2010 census, Chengdu was the 5th-most populous agglomeration in China, with 10,484,996 inhabitants in the built-up area including Xinjin County and Deyang's Guanghan City. Chengdu is also considered a World City with a "Beta +" classification according to the Globalization and World Cities Research Network.

China State in East Asia

China, officially the People's Republic of China (PRC), is a country in East Asia and the world's most populous country, with a population of around 1.404 billion. Covering approximately 9,600,000 square kilometers (3,700,000 sq mi), it is the third- or fourth-largest country by total area. Governed by the Communist Party of China, the state exercises jurisdiction over 22 provinces, five autonomous regions, four direct-controlled municipalities, and the special administrative regions of Hong Kong and Macau.

Final qualification

Knockout stage

 
Semi finalsFinal
 
      
 
 
 
 
Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 0
 
 
 
Flag of Australia.svg  Australia 1
 
Flag of Australia.svg  Australia 1 (5)
 
 
 
Flag of North Korea.svg  North Korea 1 (4)
 
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR 0
 
 
Flag of North Korea.svg  North Korea 1 (aet)
 
Third place playoff
 
 
 
 
 
Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 2
 
 
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR 0

Europe

(41 teams competing for 4 or 5 berths, host nation Germany also qualifies)

Forty-one teams from Europe were drawn into eight groups on 17 March 2009. [5] These groups were played between August 2009 and August 2010. The group winners advanced to four home-and-away play-offs (held in September 2010), with the winners advancing to the World Cup finals. The four losing teams competed in repechage play-offs the following month to determine a team to play against the third-placed CONCACAF team for the 16th place in the finals. [6]

Unlike previous qualification tournaments, all UEFA member nations were eligible to qualify. In the past, only those nations in the top tier of European nations played in qualification groups.

Direct qualification play-offs

Team 1 Agg. Team 21st leg2nd leg
France  Flag of France.svg3–2Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 0–0 3–2
England  Flag of England.svg5–2Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 2–0 3–2
Ukraine  Flag of Ukraine.svg0–3Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 0–1 0–2
Sweden  Flag of Sweden.svg4–3Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 2–1 2–2

Repechage play-offs

Italy advanced to the UEFA-CONCACAF playoff.

 Repechage IRepechage II
             
Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine 000 
Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 303 
  Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 145
 Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 022
Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 101
Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 303 

North America, Central America and Caribbean

(26 teams competing for 2 or 3 berths)

As with the last World Cup, the CONCACAF Women's Gold Cup served as the region's qualification tournament. The United States, Canada and Mexico received byes to the tournament, where they were joined by three teams from the Caribbean zone and two from Central America. Both finalists qualified automatically to the 2011 Women's World Cup. The third placed team met the fifth placed team from UEFA for an additional World Cup berth. The tournament was held in Cancún, Mexico, from 28 October to 8 November 2010. [7]

Women's Gold Cup

Knockout stage

 
Semi finalsFinal
 
      
 
5 November
 
 
Flag of Canada.svg  Canada 4
 
8 November
 
Flag of Costa Rica.svg  Costa Rica 0
 
Flag of Canada.svg  Canada 1
 
5 November
 
Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico 0
 
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 1
 
 
Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico 2
 
Third place play-off
 
 
8 November
 
 
Flag of Costa Rica.svg  Costa Rica 0
 
 
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 3

Oceania

(8 teams competing for 1 berth)

As in the previous World Cup cycle, the 2010 OFC Women's Championship served as a qualifying tournament. The tournament was held in Auckland, New Zealand, from 29 September to 8 October 2010. [8]

Teams played in two groups of four, followed by semi-finals and a final and third-place play-off. The winners, New Zealand, qualified for the Women's World Cup finals.

Final qualification

Knockout stage

 
Semi-finalsFinal
 
      
 
6 October
 
 
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 8
 
8 October
 
Flag of the Solomon Islands.svg  Solomon Islands 0
 
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 11
 
6 October
 
Flag of Papua New Guinea.svg  Papua New Guinea 0
 
Flag of Papua New Guinea.svg  Papua New Guinea 1
 
 
Flag of the Cook Islands.svg  Cook Islands 0
 
Third place
 
 
8 October
 
 
Flag of the Solomon Islands.svg  Solomon Islands 0
 
 
Flag of the Cook Islands.svg  Cook Islands 2

South America

(10 teams competing for 2 berths)

As with previous World Cup qualifications, the Sudamericano Femenino was used to determine the qualification to the World Cup finals. Qualification was held between 4 and 21 November in Ecuador. [9]

Final positions

Second stage
TeamPldPts
Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 39
Flag of Colombia.svg  Colombia 34
Flag of Chile.svg  Chile 32
Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina 31

UEFA-CONCACAF play-off

The winner of the third-place play-off at the 2010 CONCACAF Women's Gold Cup will play-off against the winner of the repechage play-offs from the UEFA qualification tournament.

The matches were played on 20 and 27 November 2010, with the order the matches were played announced following a draw held at the FIFA headquarters in Zürich on 17 March 2010. [10]

Team 1 Agg. Team 21st leg2nd leg
Italy  Flag of Italy.svg0–2Flag of the United States.svg  United States 0–1 0–1

References and notes

    1. Frequently Asked Questions, from FIFA.com, retrieved 19 March 2009.
    2. "The FIFA/Coca-Cola World Ranking". FIFA.com. Zurich, Switzerland: FIFA. 18 March 2011. Archived from the original on 15 June 2011. Retrieved 21 June 2011.
    3. Ekurhuleni Municipality set to host cream of African women's football talent, from South African Football Association, retrieved 21 September 2010.
    4. AFC Women’s Committee meeting Archived 18 July 2009 at the Wayback Machine ., from the-afc.com, retrieved 4 November 2009.
    5. EURO rivals to meet in World Cup qualifying, from UEFA.com, retrieved 26 August 2010.
    6. Women's World Cup hopefuls await draw, from UEFA.com, retrieved 26 August 2010.
    7. Women's World Cup Qualifying set for Cancun Archived 16 August 2010 at the Wayback Machine ., from www.concacaf.com, retrieved 13 August 2010.
    8. Women's Nations Cup teams learn fate Archived 3 March 2016 at the Wayback Machine ., from www.oceaniafootball.com, retrieved 20 August 2010.
    9. Sudamericano Femenino Ecuador 2010: nueva fecha de disputa, from www.conmebol.com, retrieved 11 October 2010.
    10. CONCACAF to host second leg of WWC playoff Archived 10 June 2011 at the Wayback Machine ., from concacaf.com, retrieved 18 March 2010.

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