2015 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification

Last updated

2015 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification
Tournament details
Dates 4 April 2013 – 2 December 2014
Teams 134 (from 6 confederations)
Tournament statistics
Matches played 406
Goals scored 1,686 (4.15 per match)
Top scorer(s) Flag of the Netherlands.svg Vivianne Miedema (16 goals)
2011
2019

The qualification for the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup determined which 23 teams joined Canada, the hosts of the 2015 tournament, to play for the Women's World Cup.

2015 FIFA Womens World Cup 2015 edition of the FIFA Womens World Cup

The 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup was the seventh FIFA Women's World Cup, the quadrennial international women's football world championship tournament. The tournament was hosted by Canada for the first time and by a North American country for the third time. Matches were played in six cities across Canada in five time zones. The tournament began on 6 June 2015, and finished with the final on 5 July 2015 with a United States victory over Japan.

Canada womens national soccer team womens national association football team representing Canada

The Canada women's national soccer team is overseen by the Canadian Soccer Association and competes in the Confederation of North, Central American and Caribbean Association Football (CONCACAF).

FIFA Womens World Cup international association football competition

The FIFA Women's World Cup is an international football competition contested by the senior women's national teams of the members of Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), the sport's international governing body. The competition has been held every four years since 1991, when the inaugural tournament, then called the FIFA Women's World Championship, was held in China.

Contents

The field was expanded from 16 teams in the 2011 edition to 24 in the 2015 edition. As a result, a new distribution of slots to each confederation was announced by FIFA on 11 June 2012: [1]

2011 FIFA Womens World Cup 2011 edition of the FIFA Womens World Cup

The 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup was the sixth FIFA Women's World Cup competition, the world championship for women's national association football teams. It was held from 26 June to 17 July 2011 in Germany, which won the right to host the event in October 2007. Japan won the final against the United States on a penalty shoot-out following a 2–2 draw after extra time and became the first Asian team to win a senior FIFA World Cup.

Asian Football Confederation governing body of association football in Asia

The Asian Football Confederation (AFC) is the governing body of association football in Asia and Australia. It has 47 member countries, mostly located on the Asian and Australian continent, but excludes the transcontinental countries with territory in both Europe and Asia – Azerbaijan, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Russia, and Turkey – which are instead members of UEFA. Three other states located geographically along the western fringe of Asia – Cyprus, Armenia and Israel – are also UEFA members. On the other hand, Australia, formerly in the OFC, joined the Asian Football Confederation in 2006, and the Oceanian island of Guam, a territory of the United States, is also a member of AFC, in addition to Northern Mariana Islands, one of the Two Commonwealths of the United States. Hong Kong and Macau, although not independent countries, are also members of the AFC.

Confederation of African Football governing body of association football in Africa

The Confederation of African Football or CAF is the administrative and controlling body for African association football.

CONCACAF International sport governing body

The Confederation of North, Central American and Caribbean Association Football is the continental governing body for association football in North America, which includes Central America and the Caribbean region. Three geographically South American entities — the independent nations of Guyana and Suriname and the French overseas department of French Guiana — are also members. CONCACAF's primary functions are to organize competitions for national teams and clubs, and to conduct World Cup and Women's World Cup qualifying tournaments.

A record of 134 FIFA member nations (not counting Canada) entered the qualifying tournaments. Additionally two non-FIFA nations entered the CONCACAF qualifying. Four African teams withdrew before playing any match.

Qualified
Did not qualify
Did not enter
Not active women's team 2015 womens world cup qualification.PNG
  Qualified
  Did not qualify
  Did not enter
  Not active women's team

Qualified teams

TeamQualified asQualification dateAppearance
in final
Consecutive
streak
Previous best performance FIFA
Ranking
1
Flag of Canada.svg  Canada Hosts3 March 20116th6Fourth place (2003)8
Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 2014 AFC Women's Asian Cup winner18 May 20147th7Winners (2011)3
Flag of Australia.svg  Australia 2014 AFC Women's Asian Cup runner-up18 May 20146th6Quarterfinals (2007, 2011)10
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR 2014 AFC Women's Asian Cup 3rd place17 May 20146th1Runners-up (1999)14
Flag of South Korea.svg  South Korea 2014 AFC Women's Asian Cup 4th place17 May 20142nd1First round (2003)17
Flag of Thailand.svg  Thailand 2014 AFC Women's Asian Cup 5th place21 May 20141st1Debut30
Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland UEFA qualification group 3 winner15 June 20141st1Debut18
Flag of England.svg  England UEFA qualification group 6 winner21 August 20144th3Quarterfinals (1995, 2007, 2011)7
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway UEFA qualification group 5 winner13 September 20147th7Winners (1995)9
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany UEFA qualification group 1 winner13 September 20147th7Winners (2003, 2007)2
Flag of Spain.svg  Spain UEFA qualification group 2 winner13 September 20141st1Debut16
Flag of France.svg  France UEFA qualification group 7 winner13 September 20143rd2Fourth place (2011)4
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden UEFA qualification group 4 winner17 September 20147th7Runners-up (2003)5
Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 2014 Copa América Femenina winner26 September 20147th7Runners-up (2007)6
Flag of Colombia.svg  Colombia 2014 Copa América Femenina runner-up28 September 20142nd2First Round (2011)31
Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 2014 African Women's Championship winner22 October 20147th7Quarterfinals (1999)35
Flag of Cameroon.svg  Cameroon 2014 African Women's Championship runner-up22 October 20141st1Debut51
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 2014 CONCACAF Women's Championship winner24 October 20147th7Winners (1991, 1999)1
Flag of Costa Rica.svg  Costa Rica 2014 CONCACAF Women's Championship runner-up24 October 20141st1Debut40
Flag of Cote d'Ivoire.svg  Ivory Coast 2014 African Women's Championship 3rd place25 October 20141st1Debut64
Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico 2014 CONCACAF Women's Championship 3rd place26 October 20143rd2First Round (1999, 2011)25
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 2014 OFC Women's Nations Cup winner29 October 20144th3First Round (1991, 2007, 2011)19
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands UEFA qualification play-off winner27 November 20141st1Debut15
Flag of Ecuador.svg  Ecuador CONMEBOL-CONCACAF play-off winner2 December 20141st1Debut49
1. ^ The rankings are shown as of 19 September 2014 – the last rankings published prior to the official draw. [2]

Qualifying tournaments

ConfederationTournamentNations startedQualifiedSlotsQualification startedQualification ends
AFC 2014 AFC Women's Asian Cup 2055
CAF 2014 African Women's Championship 2633
CONCACAF 2014 CONCACAF Women's Championship 28+113+13½+1
CONMEBOL 2014 Copa América Femenina 103
OFC 2014 OFC Women's Nations Cup 411
UEFA 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification (UEFA) 4688
Total134+123+123+14 April 20132 December 2014

Africa

(26 teams competing for 3 berths)

As in the previous World Cup cycle, the 2014 African Women's Championship served as the qualification tournament for the Women's World Cup. The qualifying saw a record entry of 25 CAF teams (26 if including final tournament host Namibia). Four teams though withdrew before playing any matches.

2014 African Womens Championship

The 2014 African Women's Championship, the 11th edition of the tournament, was held in Namibia. This tournament, organized by the Confederation of African Football, was also a qualification tournament for the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup, with top three qualifying for the finals in Canada. It was played on 11–25 October 2014.

The qualification procedure for the 2014 African Women's Championship, the continent's women's association football championship started on 14 February 2014. A record 25 teams applied for the 2014 African Women's Championship. Four teams eventually withdrew before playing any match.

A total of eight teams (the host nation and seven teams which came through the qualifying rounds) competed at the final tournament in Namibia from 11 to 25 October 2014. The top three teams of the final tournament qualified for the World Cup.

Knockout stage

 
SemifinalsFinal
 
      
 
22 October
 
 
Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 2
 
25 October
 
Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa 1
 
Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 2
 
22 October
 
Flag of Cameroon.svg  Cameroon 0
 
Flag of Cameroon.svg  Cameroon (a.e.t.)2
 
 
Flag of Cote d'Ivoire.svg  Ivory Coast 1
 
Third place
 
 
25 October
 
 
Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa 0
 
 
Flag of Cote d'Ivoire.svg  Ivory Coast 1

Nigeria, Cameroon and Ivory Coast qualified for the World Cup.

Asia

(20 teams competing for 5 berths)

As in the previous World Cup cycle, the 2014 AFC Women's Asian Cup served as the qualifying tournament. A total of 20 AFC teams competed for five berths.

The 2014 AFC Women's Asian Cup, the 18th edition of the competition, was a women's association football tournament competed by national teams in Asian Football Confederation (AFC). It served as the qualification for the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup. It was played from 14 to 25 May 2014 in Vietnam.

The final tournament, held in Vietnam from 14 to 25 May 2014, was competed by eight teams, four of which – Australia, China, Japan and South Korea – were automatically qualified though their 2010 placement, while the others were determined via a qualification tournament. [3] North Korea was banned from the tournament due to the sanction on their doping cases in 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup. [4]

The 2010 AFC Women's Asian Cup was held from 19–30 May at the Chengdu Sports Center in China PR. The winners, Australia, runners-up, Korea DPR, and third-place team, Japan qualified for the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup.

The 2014 AFC Women's Asian Cup qualification saw 16 nations attempt to qualify for the 2014 AFC Women's Asian Cup football competition. The four winners from all groups joined the four automatic qualifiers in the final tournament.

North Korea womens national football team womens national football team representing North Korea

The North Korea women's national football team represents North Korea in international women's football. North Korea won the AFC Women's Asian Cup in 2001, 2003, and 2008.

Group stage

The top two teams from each group advanced to the semifinals of the tournament as well as qualifying for the World Cup. The third placed teams advanced to a playoff against each other to determine the fifth and final qualifying team from the AFC.

Japan, Australia, China and South Korea qualified for the World Cup. Vietnam and Thailand advanced to the fifth-place play-off.

Fifth place play-off

Team 1 Score Team 2
Vietnam  Flag of Vietnam.svg1–2Flag of Thailand.svg  Thailand

Thailand qualified for the World Cup.

Europe

(46 teams competing for 8 berths)

A record 46 UEFA teams entered qualification. The eight lowest teams entered the tournament in the preliminary round and were drawn into two groups of four, played in single round-robin format from 4 to 9 April 2013 in Malta and Lithuania respectively. The winners and runners-up of each group advanced to the group stage.

The group stage was played in home-and-away round-robin format from 20 September 2013 to 17 September 2014. All seven group winners qualified directly to the final tournament, while the four runners-ups with the best record against the sides first, third, fourth, and fifth in their groups advanced to play-off matches for the remaining berth.

The play-off matches were played in home-and-away two-legged format on 25/26 and 29/30 October (semi-finals), and 22/23 and 26/27 November 2014 (finals).

Group stage

Germany, Spain, Switzerland, Sweden, Norway, England and France qualified for the World Cup. Italy, Scotland, Netherlands and Ukraine advanced to the play-offs.

Play-offs

 SemifinalsFinal
             
Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland 101 
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 224 
  Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 123
 Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 112
Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 224
Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine 123 

Netherlands qualified for the World Cup.

North America, Central America and Caribbean

(28 teams competing for 3 or 4 berths, host nation Canada also qualifies)

As with the previous World Cups, the 2014 CONCACAF Women's Championship served as the region's qualification tournament. A total of 30 teams entered qualifying, with Martinique and Guadeloupe not eligible for World Cup qualification as they are only members of CONCACAF and not FIFA. Therefore, a total of 28 teams were in contention for the three direct places plus the play-off place against CONMEBOL's Ecuador. Canada did not participate as they already qualified to the World Cup as hosts.

The final tournament was held in the United States from 15 to 26 October 2014, and the final group draw took place on 5 September. [5] The United States and Mexico received byes to the tournament's final round, where they were joined by Costa Rica and Guatemala from Central America and by Haiti, Jamaica, Martinique, and Trinidad and Tobago from the Caribbean zone. Both finalists and the third placed team qualified automatically to the 2015 Women's World Cup. The fourth placed team advanced to play the third placed team from CONMEBOL for an additional World Cup berth. It was announced during the Final Draw on 5 September that Martinique was not able to advance beyond the group round, and that the next best team would have taken their place in the semifinals if they finished in the top two in their group. [6] [7]

Group stage

Knockout stage

 
SemifinalsFinal
 
      
 
24 October
 
 
Flag of Costa Rica.svg  Costa Rica (pen.)1 (3)
 
26 October
 
Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago 1 (0)
 
Flag of Costa Rica.svg  Costa Rica 0
 
24 October
 
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 6
 
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 3
 
 
Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico 0
 
Third place match
 
 
26 October
 
 
Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago 2
 
 
Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico (a.e.t.)4

United States, Costa Rica and Mexico qualified for the World Cup. Trinidad and Tobago advanced to the CONCACAF–CONMEBOL play-off.

Oceania

(4 teams competing for 1 berth)

As in the previous World Cup cycle, the 2014 OFC Women's Nations Cup served as the qualifying tournament.

Only four OFC teams played in the tournament, held in Papua New Guinea from 25 to 29 October 2014. [9] That was fewer than in the last four editions of the tournament. The winner qualified.

Final stage

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification
1Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 3300300+309 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup
2Flag of Papua New Guinea.svg  Papua New Guinea (H)320174+36
3Flag of the Cook Islands.svg  Cook Islands 3012216141
4Flag of Tonga.svg  Tonga 3012120191
Source: OFC
(H) Host.

New Zealand qualified for the World Cup.

South America

(10 teams competing for 2 or 3 berths)

As with previous World Cup qualifications, the 2014 Copa América Femenina served as the qualification tournament to the World Cup finals.

All 10 CONMEBOL teams competed in the tournament, to be held in Ecuador from 11 to 28 September 2014. The top two teams of the second stage qualified directly for the World Cup, while the third placed team advanced to play the fourth placed team from CONCACAF for an additional World Cup berth.

First stage

Second stage

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification
1Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 3210100+107 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup
2Flag of Colombia.svg  Colombia 312021+15
3Flag of Ecuador.svg  Ecuador (H)31024843 CONCACAF–CONMEBOL play-off
4Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina 30122971
Source: CONMEBOL
(H) Host.

Brazil and Colombia qualified for the World Cup. Ecuador advanced to the CONCACAF–CONMEBOL play-off.

CONCACAF–CONMEBOL play-off

The play-off was contested between Trinidad and Tobago, CONCACAF's fourth-placed team, and Ecuador, CONMEBOL's third-placed team. The draw for the order of legs was held in Zürich on 22 July 2014. [10] Ecuador hosted the first leg on 8 November 2014, and Trinidad and Tobago hosted the second leg on 2 December 2014. [11]

Team 1 Agg. Team 21st leg2nd leg
Ecuador  Flag of Ecuador.svg1–0Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago 0–01–0

Ecuador qualified for the World Cup.

References and notes

  1. "Qualification slots for Canada 2015 confirmed". FIFA.com. 11 June 2012.
  2. "The FIFA/Coca-Cola World Ranking". FIFA.com. Zurich, Switzerland: FIFA. 19 September 2014. Archived from the original on 15 June 2011. Retrieved 19 September 2014.
  3. "Women's giants to know opponents". Asian Football Confederation. 18 October 2012. Archived from the original on 21 October 2012. Retrieved 18 October 2012.
  4. "VN eyes Women's World Cup on 'golden chance'". Tuổi Trẻ . 26 September 2012. Archived from the original on 25 July 2013. Retrieved 18 October 2012.
  5. "Host Cities and Qualification Format Announced for CONCACAF Women's Championship 2014". concacaf.com. 24 July 2014. Archived from the original on 21 August 2014. Retrieved 26 August 2014.
  6. "Draw Yields Matchups for CONCACAF Women's Championship USA 2014". concacaf.com. 5 September 2014. Retrieved 25 September 2014.
  7. "CONCACAF Women's Championship USA 2014 Regulations". CONCACAF. Retrieved 25 September 2014.
  8. "CONCACAF Women's Championship USA 2014 Regulations - ENGLISH Edition". CONCACAF via issuu.com. Retrieved 15 July 2017.
  9. "OFC Women's Nations Cup dates finalised". Oceania Football Confederation. 23 September 2014. Archived from the original on 26 September 2014. Retrieved 25 September 2014.
  10. "New international calendar for women's football in the spotlight". FIFA.com. 22 July 2014.
  11. "@FIFAWWC". Twitter. 21 October 2014.

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