Albert Mazibuko

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Albert Mazibuko
Born (1948-06-01) June 1, 1948 (age 73)
Years active1969–present
Associated acts Ladysmith Black Mambazo

Mdletshe Albert Mazibuko is a member of Ladysmith Black Mambazo, a South African choral group founded in 1960 by his cousin Joseph. [1]

Albert was born in Ladysmith, South Africa, and was the eldest of six sons; the others being Milton, Funokwakhe, Mehlo, Abednego, and Ngali Mazibuko]][ citation needed ]. He grew up on a farm. [2] Although his father Gaphu Densa believed in the importance of education [3] it was necessary for Albert to leave school early and he worked full-time on the farm between the ages of eight [2] and fifteen. [3] He worked as a manual labourer in a number of jobs [3] including working in an asbestos-making factory [1] prior to joining Mambazo. Albert joined Mambazo in 1969 [4] as a tenor voice, with his brother Milton as an alto voice. Aside from Joseph Shabalala, Albert is the only original member left in the group and has seen many changes; whereas the early line-ups were formed of a few Shabalalas and two Mazibukos, the group largely included members unrelated to Joseph.

After the killing of his brother Milton in 1980[ citation needed ] (by which time his brothers Funokwakhe and Ngali Mazibuko had retired, whilst his youngest brother Abednego had joined), Albert remained in the line-up and has been a full-time member of the group since 1973.

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References

  1. 1 2 Unknown (19 February 2010). "50 And Still Flourishing, Ladysmith Black Mambazo keeps living musical dream". NWAOnline. Retrieved 12 January 2011.
  2. 1 2 Craig Mathieson (26 June 2009). "Ladysmith Black Mambazo". Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 12 January 2011.
  3. 1 2 3 Victoria Williams (24 July 2009). "Singer finds great success in a cappella group". nj.com. Retrieved 12 January 2011.
  4. John Soeder (24 February 2010). "Nearly 25 years after 'Graceland,' Ladysmith Black Mambazo is still going strong". The Plain Dealer. Retrieved 12 January 2011.