Anna Maria Gove

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Anna Maria Gove
Anna Maria Gove.jpg
Gove pictured in The Carolinian (UNCG yearbook), 1932
Campus physician of The University of North Carolina at Greensboro
In office
1893–1937
Personal details
Born(1867-07-06)July 6, 1867
Whitefield, New Hampshire
Died January 28, 1948(1948-01-28) (aged 80)
Greensboro, North Carolina

Anna Maria Gove (July 6, 1867 - January 28, 1948) was an American physician.

Gove was born on July 6, 1867 in Whitefield, New Hampshire to George Sullivan and Maria Clark Gove. [1] After her education at MIT and Woman's Medical College of New York Infirmary, from which she graduated in 1892, Gove served for a year in the New York Infant Asylum. In 1893 she came to the State Normal and Industrial School (now UNCG). Gove was only the third woman to receive a medical license in the state of North Carolina. [2] She remained at the school as resident physician, professor of hygiene, and director of the Department of Health until her retirement in 1937. [3]

Whitefield, New Hampshire Town in New Hampshire, United States

Whitefield is a town in Coos County, New Hampshire, United States, in the White Mountains Region. The population was 2,306 at the 2010 census. Situated on the northern edge of the White Mountains, Whitefield is home to the Mount Washington Regional Airport and the White Mountains Regional High School.

University of North Carolina at Greensboro university

The University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG), also known as UNC Greensboro, is a public coeducational and Research university in Greensboro, North Carolina, United States and is a constituent institution of the University of North Carolina system. However, UNCG, like all members of the UNC system, is a stand-alone university and awards its own degrees. UNCG is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges to award baccalaureate, masters, specialist and doctoral degrees.

The original campus infirmary that was built in 1911 was named in Gove's honor. The infirmary built in 1953 to replace the original infirmary was also named the Gove Infirmary. [4] In September 1970, the building was officially named the Anna M. Gove Student Health Center, the name it retains today.

Fond of travel, Gove visited many parts of the world. In 1896-1897 and again in 1913-1914, she visited Vienna for postgraduate study. [5] During World War I, she served with the Red Cross in the Children's Relief Division in Marseilles and Ardeche and with the Smith College Relief Unit. In 1926-1927 she took a leave of absence from the college and traveled extensively in the Orient. She also spent many summers in study and clinical work in the United States at Cornell, Chicago, New York City and Michigan. [6] Gove died in Greensboro on January 28, 1948.

Vienna Capital city and state in Austria

Vienna is the federal capital and largest city of Austria, and one of the nine states of Austria. Vienna is Austria's primate city, with a population of about 1.9 million, and its cultural, economic, and political centre. It is the 7th-largest city by population within city limits in the European Union. Until the beginning of the 20th century, it was the largest German-speaking city in the world, and before the splitting of the Austro-Hungarian Empire in World War I, the city had 2 million inhabitants. Today, it has the second largest number of German speakers after Berlin. Vienna is host to many major international organizations, including the United Nations and OPEC. The city is located in the eastern part of Austria and is close to the borders of the Czech Republic, Slovakia, and Hungary. These regions work together in a European Centrope border region. Along with nearby Bratislava, Vienna forms a metropolitan region with 3 million inhabitants. In 2001, the city centre was designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site. In July 2017 it was moved to the list of World Heritage in Danger.

World War I 1914–1918 global war originating in Europe

World War I, also known as the First World War or the Great War, was a global war originating in Europe that lasted from 28 July 1914 to 11 November 1918. Contemporaneously described as "the war to end all wars", it led to the mobilisation of more than 70 million military personnel, including 60 million Europeans, making it one of the largest wars in history. It is also one of the deadliest conflicts in history, with an estimated nine million combatants and seven million civilian deaths as a direct result of the war, while resulting genocides and the 1918 influenza pandemic caused another 50 to 100 million deaths worldwide.

Marseille Second-largest city of France and prefecture of Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur

Marseille is the second-largest city of France. The main city of the historical province of Provence, it nowadays is the prefecture of the department of Bouches-du-Rhône and region of Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur. It is located on France's south coast near the mouth of the Rhône river. The city covers an area of 241 km2 (93 sq mi) and had a population of 852,516 in 2012. Its metropolitan area, which extends over 3,173 km2 (1,225 sq mi) is the third-largest in France after Paris and Lyon, with a population of 1,831,500 as of 2010.

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References

  1. Powell, William (1986). Dictionary of North Carolina Biography: Vol. 2, D-G, Volume 2. Chapel Hill, NC: The University of North Carolina Press. p. 324. ISBN   0-8078-1329-X . Retrieved 3 March 2015.
  2. Powell, William (1986). Dictionary of North Carolina Biography: Vol. 2, D-G, Volume 2. Chapel Hill, NC: The University of North Carolina Press. p. 324. ISBN   0-8078-1329-X . Retrieved 3 March 2015.
  3. Bowles, Elisabeth Ann (1967). A Good Beginning: The First Four Decades of the University of North Carolina. Chapel Hill, NC: The University of North Carolina Press. p. 39.
  4. Bowles, Elisabeth Ann (1967). A Good Beginning: The First Four Decades of the University of North Carolina. Chapel Hill, NC: The University of North Carolina Press. p. 39.
  5. Singer, Sandra (2003). Adventures abroad: North American women at German-speaking universities, 1868-1915. Westport, CT: Praeger Publishers. p. 42. ISBN   0-313-32371-2 . Retrieved 3 March 2015.
  6. Bowles, Elisabeth Ann (1967). A Good Beginning: The First Four Decades of the University of North Carolina. Chapel Hill, NC: The University of North Carolina Press. p. 39.