Bannister Truelock

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Bannister Truelock conspired to assassinate George III of the United Kingdom in 1800 along with James Hadfield. [1]

James Hadfield or Hatfield attempted to assassinate George III of the United Kingdom in 1800 but was acquitted of attempted murder by reason of insanity.

Truelock was a shoemaker and a religious fanatic who prophesied the second coming of Jesus Christ. He also insisted in the belief that the Messiah would be born from his mouth. [2] [3] In December 1800, he was admitted to Bethlem Royal Hospital for allegedly persuading James Hadfield that by shooting George III, Hadfield would bring peace to the world. [4]

Bethlem Royal Hospital Hospital in London

Bethlem Royal Hospital, also known as St Mary Bethlehem, Bethlehem Hospital and Bedlam, is a psychiatric hospital in London. Its famous history has inspired several horror books, films and TV series, most notably Bedlam, a 1946 film with Boris Karloff.

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References

  1. Eigen, Joel Peter. "Hadfield, James". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/41013.(Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  2. Dickens, Charles. "All the Year Round: A Weekly Journal". 17.
  3. Poole, Steve. The Politics of Regicide in England, 1760-1850: Troublesome Subjects. Manchester University Press. p. 124. ISBN   0719050359.
  4. Andrews, Jonathan. The History of Bethlem. Psychology Press, 1997. p. 390. ISBN   0415017734.