Baron Boteler

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Baron Boteler (sometimes modernly Baron Butler or Baron Botiler) was a title that was created three times in the Peerage of England.

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The first barony, Baron Boteler, of Werington, was created by writ on 23 June 1295 for William le Boteler. It became extinct on his death in circa 1328.

The second barony, Baron Boteler, of Wem, was created by writ on 19 March 1308 in the Peerage of England for William Boteler, grandson of Gruffydd Maelor II. It fell into abeyance in 1411, on the death of his great-granddaughter.

The third barony, Baron Boteler, of Brantfield in the County of Hertford, was created by letters patent on 30 July 1628 for Sir John Boteler, 1st Baronet, Member of Parliament for Hertfordshire from 1625 to 1626. He had already been created a baronet, of Hatfield Woodhall in the County of Hertford, in the Baronetage of England on 12 April 1620. [1] The titles became extinct on the death of his son, the second Baron, in 1657. George Boteler, half-brother of the first Baron, was created a baronet in 1643 (see Boteler baronets).

Barons Boteler; First creation (1295)

Barons Boteler; Second creation (1308)

Barons Boteler; Third creation (1628)

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