Baron Welles

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The title of Baron Welles has been created three times. Its first creation was for Adam de Welles on 6 May 1299 in the Peerage of England by writ of summons. This creation was extinguished by attainder in 1469. The title was created a second time in the Peerage of England by writ of summons for Sir Richard Hastings on 15 November 1482 and became extinct on his death. The third creation was on 8 January 1781, in the Peerage of Ireland, for Thomas Knox, later Viscount Northland. It is now a subsidiary title of the Earl of Ranfurly.

Contents

Barons Welles (1299)

Barons Welles (1482)

Viscount Welles (1487)

Barons Welles (1781)

For further Barons Welles, see Earl of Ranfurly.

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Richard Welles, 7th Baron Welles (c.1428–1470), was an English nobleman and soldier. From a Lancastrian family, he came to be on good terms with the Yorkist King Edward IV, but was later executed after being associated with a plot against Edward known as the "Welles Uprising".

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