Bullfrog

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Bullfrog is a common English language term to refer to large, aggressive frogs, regardless of species.

Frog Order of amphibians

A frog is any member of a diverse and largely carnivorous group of short-bodied, tailless amphibians composing the order Anura. The oldest fossil "proto-frog" appeared in the early Triassic of Madagascar, but molecular clock dating suggests their origins may extend further back to the Permian, 265 million years ago. Frogs are widely distributed, ranging from the tropics to subarctic regions, but the greatest concentration of species diversity is in tropical rainforests. There are over 7,000 recorded species, accounting for around 88% of extant amphibian species. They are also one of the five most diverse vertebrate orders. Warty frog species tend to be called toads, but the distinction between frogs and toads is informal, not from taxonomy or evolutionary history.

Contents

Examples of bullfrogs include:

Frog species

America

American bullfrog species of amphibian

The American bullfrog, often simply known as the bullfrog in Canada and the United States, is an amphibious frog, a member of the family Ranidae, or "true frogs". This frog has an olive green back and sides blotched with brownish markings and a whitish belly spotted with yellow or grey. The upper lip is often bright green and males have yellow throats. It inhabits large, permanent water bodies, such as swamps, ponds, and lakes, where it is usually found along the water's edge. The male bullfrog defends a territory during the breeding season. His call is reminiscent of the roar of a bull, which gives the frog its common name. This frog is native to southern and eastern parts of the United States and Canada, but has been widely introduced across other parts of North, Central and South America, Western Europe, and parts of Asia, and in some areas is regarded as an invasive species.

Cane toad Worlds largest toad

The cane toad, also known as the giant neotropical toad or marine toad, is a large, terrestrial true toad native to South and mainland Central America, but which has been introduced to various islands throughout Oceania and the Caribbean, as well as Northern Australia. It is the world's largest toad. It is a member of the genus Rhinella, but was formerly assigned to the genus Bufo, which includes many true toad species found throughout Central and South America. The cane toad is a prolific breeder; females lay single-clump spawns with thousands of eggs. Its reproductive success is partly because of opportunistic feeding: it has a diet, unusual among anurans, of both dead and living matter. Adults average 10–15 cm (3.9–5.9 in) in length; the largest recorded specimen had a snout-vent length of 24 cm (9.4 in).

Australia

<i>Limnodynastes dorsalis</i> species of amphibian

Limnodynastes dorsalis is a frog species from the family Myobatrachidae. The informal names for this species are western banjo frog, pobblebonk, sand frog, chazwazzers and bullfrog. It is one of the endemic amphibians of Western Australia.

<i>Limnodynastes dumerilii</i> species of amphibian

Limnodynastes dumerilii is a frog species from the family Myobatrachidae. The informal names for the species and its subspecies include eastern or southern banjo frog, and bull frog. The frog is also called the pobblebonk after its distinctive "bonk" call, which is likened to a banjo string being plucked. There are five subspecies of L. dumerilii, each with different skin coloration. The species is native to eastern Australia. There has been one occurrence in New Zealand, when tadpoles of the species were found in 1999 and destroyed.

Giant banjo frog species of amphibian

The giant banjo frog, giant bullfrog, or great bullfrog is a species of frog in the family Myobatrachidae. It is endemic to Australia. Its natural habitats are temperate forests, subtropical or tropical swamps, dry savanna, moist savanna, subtropical or tropical dry lowland grassland, rivers, intermittent rivers, swamps, freshwater marshes, intermittent freshwater marshes, water storage areas, and ponds. It is threatened by habitat loss.

Africa

African bullfrog species of amphibian

The African bullfrog is a species of frog in the family Pyxicephalidae. It is also known as the pixie frog due to its scientific name. It is found in Angola, Botswana, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania, Zambia, Zimbabwe, and possibly the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

Calabresi's bullfrog is a species of frogs in the family Pyxicephalidae. It is endemic to northeastern and central Somalia.

Crowned bullfrog species of amphibian

The crowned bullfrog is a species of frog in the Dicroglossidae family. It is found in the Sub-Saharan Africa . Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, dry savanna, moist savanna, subtropical or tropical dry shrubland, subtropical or tropical moist shrubland, subtropical or tropical dry lowland grassland, subtropical or tropical seasonally wet or flooded lowland grassland, rivers, intermittent rivers, freshwater lakes, intermittent freshwater lakes, freshwater marshes, intermittent freshwater marshes, freshwater springs, arable land, pastureland, rural gardens, heavily degraded former forest, and ponds.

Asia

Chinese edible frog species of amphibian

The Chinese edible frog, East Asian bullfrog, or Taiwanese frog is a species of frog in the Dicroglossidae family. It is found in Cambodia, China, Hong Kong, Laos, Macau, Malaysia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Taiwan, Thailand, and Vietnam. Its natural habitats are freshwater marshes, intermittent freshwater marshes, arable land, pasture land, rural gardens, urban areas, ponds, aquaculture ponds, open excavations, irrigated land, seasonally flooded agricultural land, and canals and ditches. They breed in spring–early summer.

<i>Hoplobatrachus crassus</i> species of amphibian

Hoplobatrachus crassus, also called Jerdon's bullfrog, Jerdon's bull frog, and South Indian bullfrog, is a species of frog found widely distributed on the plains of India, Bangladesh, Nepal, and Sri Lanka. Its range may extend to the adjacent Bhutan and Myanmar.

<i>Hoplobatrachus tigerinus</i> species of amphibian

Hoplobatrachus tigerinus, the Indus Valley bullfrog or Indian bullfrog, popular name Asian bullfrog, Asean bullfrog or Asia bullfrog, is a large species of frog found in mainland Myanmar, Bangladesh, India, Pakistan, Afghanistan, and Nepal. It has been introduced in Madagascar and India's Andaman Islands, where it is now a widespread invasive species.

See also

Bullfrog is a large aggressive frog, of any of a number of species

A frog is a member of a diverse group of amphibians composing the order Anura.

Cane toads may refer to:

Related Research Articles

True frog family of frogs

The true frogs, family Ranidae, have the widest distribution of any frog family. They are abundant throughout most of the world, occurring on all continents except Antarctica. The true frogs are present in North America, northern South America, Europe, Africa, and Asia. The Asian range extends across the East Indies to New Guinea and a single species has spread into the far north of Australia.

<i>Pyxicephalus</i> genus of amphibians

Pyxicephalus is a genus of true frogs from Sub-Saharan Africa, commonly referred to as African bull frogs or bull frogs.

Edible bullfrog species of amphibian

The edible bullfrog, also known as the pixie frog, lesser bullfrog or Peter's bullfrog, is a large bodied species of frog in the Pyxicephalidae family.

Tree frog any species of frog that spends a major portion of its lifespan in trees

A tree frog is any species of frog that spends a major portion of its lifespan in trees, known as an arboreal state. Several lineages of frogs among the Neobatrachia have given rise to tree frogs, although they are not closely related to each other.

Green frog may refer to various frogs worldwide:

The Amphibians of Western Australia are represented by two families of frogs. Of the 78 species found, most within the southwest, 38 are unique to the state. 15 of the 30 genera of Australian frogs occur; from arid regions and coastlines to permanent wetlands.

P. edulis may refer to:

Edulis, edible in Latin, is a species name present in a number of Latin species names:

The marbled frog is a species of ground-dwelling frog in the family Myobatrachidae native to northern and north-eastern Australia, and southern New Guinea.

The eastern frog (Ingerana) is a genus of frogs in the family Dicroglossidae distributed in southeastern Asia, from Nepal, northeastern India, and southwestern China to Indochina, Borneo, and the Philippines.